Talk:Cetane number

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Energy  
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Energy, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Energy on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 

Anybody know what the story is on finding out the cetane number of fuel at the pump? I see octane rating at every gasoline pump these days, but I've never seen a cetane rating. Are they required to display octane, but not cetane? Or is there just no demand for it?

I'm not sure, but maybe they believe owners of diesel-fueled cars don't consider the cetane number (or don't care/know about) while purchasing their fuel. Most people consider diesel just for its fuel economy.
It may also change with seasonal changes to composition. Rmhermen 00:50, 4 March 2006 (UTC)

The CFR engine is slowly being replaced by newer test instruments such as the Ignition Quality Tester. (www.aet.ca)

The Cetane number here in the lower 48 is on the diesel pump. There's a yellow sticker about 3"x3" with either a 40 or 45 in it. If its regular diesel its 40 and 45 being premium diesel.  —Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.82.122.25 (talk) 13:49, 14 April 2008 (UTC) 

I have a customer who is a deisel mechanic and he never heard of a cetane number. They use specific gravity to measure diesel fuel quality. Anyone know how that works or how it could translate into a centane number? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.222.213.232 (talk) 03:08, 17 October 2008 (UTC)

A diesel mechanic who has never heard of cetane numbers? Scary... Specific gravity is a good indicator of the fuel's density, but not of its combustion qualities. I'm not sure why anyone would be measuring the fuel's specific gravity. Perhaps they are trying to determine how much water is entrained in the fuel (water has a higher specific gravity than diesel fuel). The specific gravity of the fuel itself is set by the refinery according to strict specifications. Shreditor (talk) 08:35, 17 October 2008 (UTC)

What is the difference between FIT and IQT? Their descriptive paragraphs are identical. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 216.23.203.2 (talk) 13:45, 14 October 2012 (UTC)