Talk:Chad (paper)

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Untitled[edit]

The top of the article states terms by number of corners attached. Body of article does same thing using different criteria. Jerry lavoie 00:01, 8 December 2006 (UTC)

fixed in accordance with Macmillan English Dictionary on chads. --YbborT 02:37, 8 December 2006 (UTC)

land lock country in central Africa. with the US election and the florida controversy etc etc, would a hanging chad be a valid vote and a pregnant chad not? could somebody who knows please make it clearer, as it was a little ambiguous in the article. Saccerzd 16:54, 3 December 2006 (UTC)


If a chad is the small piece of paper that is punched out of a piece of paper or card, or plastic, or metal even and if a perforation is the hole that is made in film, what is the piece of film called that is punched out when making perforations? Anyone know?

Thanks

—The preceding unsigned comment was added by 208.181.178.24 (talkcontribs) .

'Probably still called "chad". "Waste" or "scrap" might be other terms.
Atlant 16:33, 29 September 2006 (UTC)

Chad are paper particles created when holes are made in a paper, card or similar synthetic materials, typically computer punched tape or punch cards. Note: the term 'Chads' is invalid, the plural of chad is chad. This contradicts Wiktionary, which states that chad is both a singular form and a mass noun, the plural form being "chads". —Preceding unsigned comment added by 82.24.189.88 (talk) 09:42, 26 May 2008 (UTC)

Etymology[edit]

I would suspect either "shard" (and its etymology) or from the pet name for Charles after Charles Wheatstone, inventor of telegraph, and punched paper tape. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Softwarestorage (talkcontribs) 02:47, 7 September 2008 (UTC)

OED[edit]

chad, n.2 Telegr. and Computing. (t{sh}æd) [Origin unknown.]
(A piece of) the waste material removed from punched cards or tape during punching.
1959 J. W. FREEBODY Telegr. xi. 460/2 The small hinged discs of paper, called ‘chads’, remain attached to the body of the tape. 1968 J. BLACKBURN Nothing but Night vii. 64 The machines..spewed out the sixty-four-row punch cards... At the base of each machine was a vacuum tube to remove the dust and the chads. 1982 Computerworld 9 Aug. 59 The reader head is mounted on the front of the unit next to the chad box.
Hence {sm}chadless a., not producing or accompanied by chads.
1959 J. W. FREEBODY Telegr. xi. 460/2 In order..that the printed characters are completely legible, the tape is perforated by the chadless method. 1971 Gloss. Electrotechnical, Power Terms (B.S.I.) III. iii. 19 Chadless perforation. 1984 U.S. Patent 4,425,394 1 Each tag has a chadless hole provided by a pattern of knife cuts. 62.64.203.223 (talk) 10:37, 4 November 2008 (UTC)

Didcot[edit]

The line 'Chad from railway tickets, at least in Britain, are known as "didcots".' is (unfortunately) false. I have found no sources to confirm it and the only source I have found refuting it is a transcript from QI episode S4E4 that says it's an absurdist joke from Monty Python's Meaning of Liff about the English town of Didcot (see: http://www.freewebs.com/qitranscripts/404.htm). On balance, I have therefore decided to remove it instead of attaching citation needed. Mike3685 (talk) 10:00, 15 April 2010 (UTC)


I have removed the Didcot information from this article after it was replaced. If anyone can source any additional information on Didcots please reference it before adding it again. Tindy1986 (talk) 00:44, 3 September 2011 (UTC)

Why does "snaf" redirect here?[edit]

Presumably because it occurs in the "Jargon File" / "New Hacker's Dictionary" where it is claimed to mean something like chad. However, most terms in that book have seen zero real-world usage. Remove redirect? 86.159.197.174 (talk) 04:05, 26 August 2014 (UTC)