Talk:Chaldean Neo-Aramaic

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"Sureth"[edit]

I'm not convinced that "Sureth" is a synonym for Chaldean Neo-Aramaic especially when the editor is adding it to multiple Aramaic-related articles. It seems to be a synonym for Classical Syriac and not for any of the modern languages. (Taivo (talk) 13:03, 22 April 2009 (UTC))

That's incorrect. Classical Syriac is called Suryaya (sometimes spelt Suraya, though the for with two ys is original), Kthawanaya, Orhaya or Leshshana d-Qorbana. Sureth is not regularly used to refer to the classical language. It is a term used in Christian NENA varieties for those languages. It literally means 'Syriac' but uses an adjectival ending rarely used in the classical language. I have seen Sureth used in a NENA text to refer to the classical language, but is was clear from the context that the classical language was meant, and not the modern language (which latter would be its usual meaning). — Gareth Hughes (talk) 22:34, 22 April 2009 (UTC)