Talk:Chelsea, Massachusetts

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Untitled[edit]

I'm going to remove "Chelsea is the smallest city in the United States. It is just 1.8 square miles." Reason: Central Falls, RI is 1.3 1.3 mi² ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_Falls ) , and I am not sure that Central Falls is the smallest

History[edit]

How could Chelsea have been part of Boston in its first few years if Boston did not exist until 1630? -- Beland 01:07, 27 November 2006 (UTC)

Yo. Update this census account in the demographics — Preceding unsigned comment added by 4.71.183.238 (talk) 19:10, 5 July 2011 (UTC)

2010 Census[edit]

Can someone please update the demographics? ΔΡΦ (talk) 21:41, 12 December 2011 (UTC)

Population Density[edit]

Chelsea is only 1.8 square miles of land. If you look at the table linked to with US city densities it uses a larger land area. I believe Chelsea should actually be ranked 15th most dense city, not 26th. Looking at other cities on the list (including NYC) they make this land vs land+water distinction when calculating density. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Brufleth (talkcontribs) 20:03, 27 April 2012 (UTC)

Elizabeth Cady Stanton[edit]

Elizabeth Cady Stanton (American social activist, abolitionist, and leading figure of the early women's rights movement) spent much of the 1840s in the Boston area; their home (from about 1843 to 1847) was actually not in the city of Boston, but rather in Chelsea, a city in Suffolk County directly across the Mystic River, just north of downtown Boston.

"She had married Stanton on May 10, 1840, at the age of 25 and accompanied him immediately thereafter on a journey to the World's Anti-Slavery Convention in London. At the close of the convention, the Stantons traveled around the British Isles and France for several months; in November 1840, they returned to Elizabeth Cady Stanton's childhood home in Johnstown, New York, where Henry Stanton studied law for two years under his father-in-law, Judge Daniel Cady. In 1842, Henry Stanton started a law practice of his own in Boston and the family relocated to a home outside the city of Chelsea. [1] [1. Edward T. James, Janet Wilson James, Paul S. Boyer, eds, Notable American Women, Vol. III (Massachusetts, 1971), pp. 342-3.]

Here, Elizabeth Cady Stanton wrote "I spent some of the happiest days of my life, enjoying, in turn, the beautiful outlook, my children, and my books." [2] [2. Stanton, Eighty Years, p. 140.] Through her husband's associations with the leading abolitionist and reform figures of the day she made the acquaintance of many of the liberal, literary, and philosophical lights then illuminating Boston. Stanton took full advantage of her stimulating situation and later wrote that "I attended all the lectures, churches, theaters, concerts, and temperance, peace, and prison-reform conventions within my reach. I had never lived in such an enthusiastically literary and reform latitude before, and my mental powers were kept at the highest tension." [3] [3. Stanton, Eighty Years, p. 133.] Henry Stanton's health, however, was not up to the raw Boston winters, and after four years the decision was made to return to New York state." www.nps.gov/history/history/online_books/wori/shs3.htm -96.233.27.148 (talk) 14:57, 6 December 2013 (UTC)