Talk:Chen case

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Law (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon


This article is within the scope of WikiProject Law, an attempt at providing a comprehensive, standardised, pan-jurisdictional and up-to-date resource for the legal field and the subjects encompassed by it.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject European Union (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject European Union, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of the European Union on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Am I right in saying that, in addition to what is stated in the article about her eligibility to become a British citizen, Irish citizenship already gives her rights over and above EU citizenship, such as the right to vote and stand for office in all UK elections (EU citizens can vote in local and European Parliament elections in countries other than their own)?

That's correct. Irish citizens have certain rights in the UK over and above most other citizens of EU/EEA member states, including the right to vote. Additionally, because of the Common Travel Area Irish citizens are automatically deemed to have Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR), which is important from the point of view of naturalisation eligibility and the right of UK-born children to have British citizenship. Cyprus and Malta citizens also have voting rights as these are Commonwealth states, however they don't get ILR automatically. However there are a few things which Irish citizens in the UK are not eligible for unless they take out British citizenship: they can't have British passports, pass on British citizenship to overseas born children, they are still liable to deportation and cannot access policy-level Civil Service positions (about 25% of the total). Also, Irish citizens can only receive honorary awards such as OBE or knighthood. JAJ 23:51, 15 April 2006 (UTC)

I think this article should probably be moved to something like "The Catherine Chen case", because it is not she that is notable but the precedent and it's effect on Irish politics. --kingboyk 12:41, 28 May 2006 (UTC)

The article was originally at Chen Case and this is probably what should be the primary reference, as it's what it's best known as. Wikipedia articles should not normally start with "The" JAJ 14:50, 28 May 2006 (UTC)
Thanks. I've moved it back. --kingboyk 15:04, 28 May 2006 (UTC)

Automatic citizenship?[edit]

[...] by giving birth in Belfast, Mrs. Chen automatically obtained Irish citizenship for her daughter [...]

From what I can gather, Catherine was not automatically an Irish citizen but was entitled to Irish citizenship, and Mrs Chen obtained such citizenship for her by doing something that only Irish citizens may do, namely obtaining an Irish passport. Hairy Dude (talk) 19:20, 17 August 2008 (UTC)