Talk:Chicago Lawn, Chicago

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Copyright infringement[edit]

Large parts of this paragraph are copied verbatim from the Encyclopedia of Chicago.

Our text: Chicago's changing racial demographics had a profound impact on Chicago Lawn. In the 1960s Chicago Lawn became a target for civil rights groups' open housing marches. In 1966 a march led by Martin Luther King, Jr., into Marquette Park met a violent reaction. King himself was hit by a rock. Violence also erupted in the neighborhood when Gage Park High School attempted to integrate after Brown v. Board of Education. The primary resistance to integration came from fear of declining property values by people who put their life savings into their homes and disruption of ethnic bonds, especially for the Lithuanians.

Encyclopedia of Chicago text:

Chicago's changing racial demographics had a profound impact on Chicago Lawn. By 1960 its population swelled to over 51,000 as whites fled Englewood and West Englewood. In the mid-1960s Chicago Lawn became a target for civil rights groups' open housing marches. In 1966 a march led by Martin Luther King, Jr., into Marquette Park met a violent reaction. King himself was hit by a rock. Violence also erupted in the neighborhood when Gage Park High School attempted integration. To add to the neighborhood's notoriety, the American Nazi Party opened a headquarters here aiming to further fan the flames of racial tension. However, the Nazis did not find the sympathetic support they expected. Many East European immigrants had their own horror stories about the Nazis. The primary resistance to integration came from fear of declining property values by people who put their life savings into their homes and disruption of ethnic bonds, especially for the Lithuanians.

--69.251.227.214 04:43, 29 May 2007 (UTC)

I can clean that up this weekend. Thanks.--Eva bd 14:25, 29 May 2007 (UTC)