Talk:Chicago school (architecture)

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Merge with Chicago architecture[edit]

From what I can gather, the two articles are about the same thing, and should be merged to avoid overlap and redundancy. - Log'a'log 02:25, 29 January 2007 (UTC)

The articles do not cover the same topic. Chicago architecture is about buildings in the city, while this article covers the architectural movement. I'm going to remove the tags, and I suggest rereading the articles. - EurekaLott 03:58, 29 January 2007 (UTC)

Wainright building[edit]

Not all examples of Chicago School architecture are in Chicago. The list provided in the article gives us one example, the Wainright building in St. Louis. chazman 01:04, 13 February 2007 (UTC)

Chicago bay windows[edit]

Is the "Chicago bay window" a part of the Chicago school? Pknkly (talk) 02:09, 10 May 2009 (UTC)

Filene's?[edit]

I'm trying to figure out why Filene's Department Store was added as an example of a Chicago School building, but I'm at a loss. The infobox on the Filene's article identifies it as a Beaux Arts building, as do most other sources. The study cited in this article describes the building as "a monumental commercial building designed in the Beaux Arts style." The study does note its Chicago windows, but their presence doesn't automatically make it Chicago School architecture. - Eureka Lott 21:04, 23 November 2013 (UTC)

"While the architecture of the Italian Renaissance may have served as inspiration for the overall massing and detailing of the building, the steel structure beneath the terra cotta façade allowed for a “modern” expression that reflected the influence of the Chicago School, specifically the large space devoted to fenestration, allowing for maximum infiltration of light and air. The steel frame also allowed for an open, spacious interior with few structural members interfering with sales space." Rmhermen (talk) 23:24, 23 November 2013 (UTC)
Yes, I saw that, too, thank you. The design has elements that reflect Chicago School theories, but I think it's misleading to call it a Chicago School building. The store was Daniel Burnham's last major building, and by that point in his career his buildings were quite different from his early work. - Eureka Lott 23:43, 23 November 2013 (UTC)