Talk:Chinese musicology

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject China (Rated Stub-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject China, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of China related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Stub-Class article Stub  This article has been rated as Stub-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Philosophy (Rated Stub-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Philosophy, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of content related to philosophy on Wikipedia. If you would like to support the project, please visit the project page, where you can get more details on how you can help, and where you can join the general discussion about philosophy content on Wikipedia.
Stub-Class article Stub  This article has been rated as Stub-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Explanations[edit]

Please do not reduce the explanations in this article without discussing changes here. If you want improvements in the article, please specify them here. P0M 04:21, 7 February 2006 (UTC)

Western notation system[edit]

Please, check this diff http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Chinese_musicology&diff=93315453&oldid=90182697 It's clear that "do re mi familiar to US and UK" is too specific and not accurate at all; Then my solution is not ideal, but I learned I could directly link Western notation system to Musical Notation because they're actually the same thing at the time of writing. Maybe we should do some merging. Sdistefano 06:12, 10 December 2006 (UTC)

If you will do some more reading on sol-fa you will find that in some countries, actually most countries, do is assigned to a specific and unvarying frequency, not to the first note in the sung scale. You have changed the article so that it is no longer correct. P0M 05:55, 13 December 2006 (UTC)

history[edit]

"a very long history"? is that really enough said?

Ungrounded assertions[edit]

Someone has added to the text:

The first musical scales were derived from the harmonic series. On the Guqin all of the dotted positions are equal string length divisions related to the open string like 1/2, 1/3, 2/3, 1/4, 3/4, etc. and are quite easy to recognize on this instrument. The Guqin has a scale of 13 positions all representing a natural harmonic position related to the open string. All musical tunings all over the world are based on this primary system. Afterwards different cultures moved to alternate variations of this harmonic system.

The "guqin" is not the standard for the Chinese music of antiquity. The 史記 had the mathematical description, in embryo, around 10 A.D. The earliest instruments that I know about were flutes made by drilling holes in bird bones, but getting exact frequencies must have been a matter of art and good luck. The earliest theory was written in terms of flute wind column lengths, i.e., what lengths of single bamboo tubes to use as standards. Dividing strings or columns of air by 4, 5, or 7 was not part of the written musicological tradition.

So where is your proof? P0M (talk) 03:33, 11 October 2011 (UTC)