Talk:Chirality

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Here is a nice 250 page book that is all about the general topic of chirality; a few dozen choice pages are available to view on Google Books. Cheers! bd2412 T 14:09, 12 August 2011 (UTC)

Move done[edit]

Move done, see Talk:Chirality (disambiguation)#Re-write suggestion for discussion. Cheers! bd2412 T 14:29, 16 August 2011 (UTC)

Earlier publication titled "Chirality" Lancelot Law Whyte Leonardo, Vol. 8, pp 245-248 Pergamon Press 1975

   http://geomsymm.cnsm.csulb.edu/courses/303/reading/whyteChirality.pdf

The book by Georges Henry Wagnière, On Chirality and the Universal Asymmetry: Reflections on Image and Mirror Image (2007), uses the same quote (page 23) from the "Looking Glass" by Lewis Carroll that Whyte used in his publication. Wagnière does not cite the Whyte book. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Electricworm (talkcontribs) 18:00, 4 February 2012 (UTC)

Insufficient information in the article.[edit]

The Chemistry section of this article is incomplete. It should discuss how chiral molecules permit clockwise circularty polarized light through the substance at a different speed than counterclockwise circularly polarized light. It discusses circularly polarized light in a diagram but not how it relates to chiral molecules. The physics section is incorrect. The laws of electromagnatism are actually achiral. The direction of a magnetic field is only something we define, not something we observe. Had we defined it to point in the opposite direction, then we would observe a mirror image of all the laws of electromagnetism occuring. For instance, we use the right hand rule for how a magnet moving through a coil creates a current and the left hand rule for which way a magnetic field will go in circles around a wire with a current. If we define the magnetic field to be pointing in the opposite direction, then we would use the left hand rule for a magnet going through a coil, but we would also use the right hand rule for a current generating a magnetic field, cancelling out the effect of using the left hand rule for the other thing, thus making the laws achiral. The mirror image of a magnet going through a coil inducing a current really is possible because a magnet has spinning electrons and not a concentration of charges at one end and having the electrons spin the opposite direction would turn the north end into a south end. A south end is also something we define, not something we observe. A magnetic field is actually a relativistic effect of an electric field so there's no option of electromagnetic laws being chiral. A spinning charged particle actually generates a magnetic field for the exact same reason as a spinning object with gravity drags space time around it. Blackbombchu (talk) 23:15, 31 July 2013 (UTC)

You are free to add that information to the article if you can provide sources. Also, there is a more extensive article at Chirality (chemistry). Cheers! bd2412 T 18:47, 24 January 2013 (UTC)
I actually figured out by myself that the laws of electromagnetism are achiral so I won't be able to find any sources. Blackbombchu (talk) 23:15, 31 July 2013 (UTC)

145.53.4.1 (talk) 12:02, 14 December 2014 (UTC)