Talk:Chocolate

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Former good article Chocolate was one of the Agriculture, food and drink good articles, but it has been removed from the list. There are suggestions below for improving the article to meet the good article criteria. Once these issues have been addressed, the article can be renominated. Editors may also seek a reassessment of the decision if they believe there was a mistake.
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It's happening again[edit]

After going out of semi-protection, this time it took a little longer for vandalism to get to the level making the article un-editable. But now it is. I believe it is time for semi-protection to set again. Eldar (talk) 22:22, 15 September 2010 (UTC)

Archive 4[edit]

Any threads that have not been active for a month or so have been moved to Archive 4. --Wtshymanski (talk) 19:58, 17 October 2010 (UTC)

Edit request from MarcoMaya, 9 November 2010[edit]

{{edit semi-protected}} Chocolate (pronounced /ˈtʃɑklət/ in North America or /ˈtʃɒkəl(ɨ)t/ in British Commonwealth nations outside of North America ( listen)) comprises a number of raw and processed foods produced from the seed of the tropical Theobroma cacao tree. Cacao has been cultivated for at least three millennia in Mexico, Central America, with its earliest documented use around 1500 BC. The majority of the Mesoamerican people made chocolate beverages, including the Aztecs, who made it into a beverage known as cacahuaatl '[ref]Fray Alonso de Molina: Vocabulario en Lengua Castellana y Mexicana y Mexicana y Castellana.' An alternative spelling is chokolatl "bitter water" in the Nahuatl Mayan language. ' The seeds of the cacao tree have an intense bitter taste, and must be fermented to develop the flavor. If you disagree on erasing xocoatl, please look at the next section Etymology or read the sources. It is true xocoatl never appears in classical nahuatl sources. Some of the articles are written of really good scholars. I have put my reference on the very best nahuatl-spanish dictonary in italics. MarcoMaya (talk) 09:53, 9 November 2010 (UTC)

Note: I can't readily verify the source. But it's in the special collections vault at my library. I'll try to locate it if no one else fulfills this request in a timely manner. -Atmoz (talk) 15:48, 9 November 2010 (UTC)
So how did they render their word for "chocolate" in English letters? Is this just a case of different transcriptions of Nahuatl into English letters? --Wtshymanski (talk) 18:01, 9 November 2010 (UTC)
I'm going to decline this until the source can be verified. Is there an online version of this book, such as on Google Books or JSTOR? Hersfold (t/a/c) 19:43, 9 November 2010 (UTC)
Oops, never mind, I found it. I'm trying to verify it now. Hersfold (t/a/c) 19:46, 9 November 2010 (UTC)
Unfortunately there aren't any page numbers, but I'm pretty sure I've found it; the spelling above isn't exact but the entry reads "Cacauaatl. beuida de cacao", which my rudimentary Spanish is translating as "drink of chocolate". If anyone else wants to confirm, here's the Google Books link, and there are two other digitalizations available at the book's article. I'll still leave this for now, just to make sure there's a consensus for it. Hersfold (t/a/c) 20:04, 9 November 2010 (UTC)
From a source I have long forgotten the identity of, I recall the native name as "xoco-lot". This might only be a confusion matter... Regards, Nikevich (talk) 06:59, 22 November 2010 (UTC)

Minor copy-editing query[edit]

I see, near the beginning of the text,

"Cocoa solids contain alkaloids such as theobromine and phenethylamine, which have physiological effects on the body. It has been linked to serotonin levels in the brain."

What does 'it' refer back to? Is it the substance called "cocoa solids", or is it an instance of "it", drifting into contemporary usage with a plural antecedent, referring to theobromine and phenethylamine? Regards, Nikevich (talk) 06:59, 22 November 2010 (UTC)

Omitted topics, or close...[edit]

From the Wikipedia articel about the history of chocolate:

"At the end of the 18th century, the first form of solid chocolate was invented in Turin by Doret. This chocolate was sold in large quantities from 1826 by Pierre Paul Caffarel. In 1819, F. L. Cailler opened the first Swiss chocolate factory. In 1828, Dutchman Coenraad Johannes van Houten patented a method for extracting the fat from cocoa beans and making powdered cocoa and cocoa butter. Van Houten also developed the "so-called" Dutch process of treating chocolate with alkali to remove the bitter taste. This made it possible to form the modern chocolate bar. It is believed that the Englishman Joseph Fry made the first chocolate for eating in 1847, followed in 1849 by the Cadbury brothers."

IIrc, this article (Chocolate) doesn't mention pressing to extract cocoa butter, nor does it describe the alkali process; both seem like quite-serious omissions. Regards, Nikevich (talk) 10:21, 22 November 2010 (UTC)


This article also seems to omit refining, or at least to try to include it in the conching description, even though the conching article makes no mention of this beong a grinding step. Raisedonadiet (talk) 10:02, 3 October 2011 (UTC)

Cacao[edit]

"Around three quarters of the world's cacao bean production takes place in West Africa."

I may not be right, but doesn't English only use the word "cocoa?" —Preceding unsigned comment added by 96.50.74.105 (talk) 03:17, 27 January 2011 (UTC)

I think you are right - unless the "cacao" is something different to "cocoa". ACEOREVIVED (talk) 09:43, 12 July 2012 (UTC)

In fact, if you click on "Cacao bean" you get redirected to "cocoa bean". ACEOREVIVED (talk) 09:45, 12 July 2012 (UTC)

You're wrong. Cacao is pronounced the same as cocoa but is spelled differently. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.168.116.102 (talk) 18:55, 22 July 2012 (UTC)

Choco bakery defined[edit]

“A snack product that combines a traditional sweet or savory flour based biscuit, wafer or cake with chocolate aggregates, a chocolate layer/coating or a biscuit molded with chocolate”.

Choco bakery products are normally born from new product ideas stemming from traditional biscuit brands and makers mark, but recently chocolate brands have entered and gained prominence in this blurred consumer space. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 206.228.220.37 (talk) 16:45, 1 February 2011 (UTC)

Pleasure[edit]

In the first paragraph under "Potential health effects," the word "pleasure" links to the article on Epicureanism. Why not just have it link to the Pleasure article? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.100.40.37 (talk) 02:50, 2 February 2011 (UTC)

Edit request from 76.115.61.55, 3 February 2011[edit]

{{edit semi-protected}}

Can you please put: http://www.luluschocolate.com on the map? We have been making yummy Raw Chocolate since 2007! Spanks!

76.115.61.55 (talk) 04:54, 3 February 2011 (UTC)

Not done: See WP:LINKFARM. Wikipedia is not a mirror or a repository of links, images, or media files. Viriditas (talk) 05:08, 3 February 2011 (UTC)

Child labor[edit]

As it is currently written, this article and the related one on children in cocoa production read as an attempt to bury the child labor, exploitation and slavery / forced labor issue. It's a big issue, one that deserves its own subheading under Production, so it would show up in the listing of sections at the top and people could become aware of it. See for example: http://money.cnn.com/2008/01/24/news/international/chocolate_bittersweet.fortune/

I'd suggest collecting the few sentences you have, adding a reference to the other central issue of exploitation and forced labor (i.e., it's not just that children are working - they are working against their will, often as captives), and the link to the other article on the topic, under a suitable subheading in the Production section.

It doesn't have to be long, but it shouldn't be disingenous to the point of being misleading, as it is now. "Children in cocoa production" is an incredible understatement of the issue. Google on chocolate slavery, if you need a reality check. 68.162.207.160 (talk) 20:35, 20 February 2011 (UTC)

I just read this post re. child labor in the chocolate industry. Wow...There is a lot written on this subject.(GlassLadyBug (talk) 20:23, 6 October 2012 (UTC))

YouTube video of interesting chocolate maker in Paris[edit]

Came across a cool video of a chocolate shop -- chocolate sculptures, candies, etc. People who follow this page may wish to consider adding it to the external links: Visit to a Paris chocolate shop --Tomwsulcer (talk) 00:10, 18 March 2011 (UTC)

Chocolate making process[edit]

"Chocolate in its solid form was invented in 1847." And the next paragraph: "For hundreds of years, the chocolate making process remained unchanged. When the people saw the Industrial Revolution arrive, many changes occurred that brought about the food today in its modern form." And again: "In the 18th century, mechanical mills were created that squeezed out cocoa butter..." I see some inconsistency with the dates, because the 18th century means the 1700s, and the Industrial Revolution was close to its end in 1847.--80.99.207.235 (talk) 17:17, 29 March 2011 (UTC)

After looking at the timeline of chocolate I couldn't see anything I would want to change in those paragraphs. Darrell_Greenwood (talk) 17:54, 29 March 2011 (UTC)

Source[edit]

WhisperToMe (talk) 23:00, 6 April 2011 (UTC)

All fieldmuseum.org links (in citations) are obselete[edit]

Many linked pages used in citations for this article appear to have been removed from the fieldmuseum.org site.

Penina (talk) 13:22, 12 April 2011 (UTC)

Health Effects[edit]

in Health effects, boost appears to have been misspelled as bust, which changes the meaning. I checked the article cited and I'm quite sure it should be boost not bust. Please fix it. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 193.24.65.33 (talk) 04:15, 14 April 2011 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done Thanks for the note. Typo fixed. Darrell_Greenwood (talk) 16:16, 14 April 2011 (UTC)

The cited article #75 seems to be an article that shows the health effects of plant sterols on cholesterol, and cocoa flavanols on blood pressure, not one that shows cholesterol reduction effects of chocolate. The chocolate bars (without added plant sterols) were administered to the control group as well. The chocolate on its own contained flavanols, which were shown to reduce blood pressure, but it was the plant sterols that led to the reduction of cholesterol levels (at least, that is what they were testing). Suggest clarification of studied effects or replacement of citation with one that actually suggests that chocolate lowers cholesterol levels. 128.83.114.193 (talk) 22:01, 31 July 2013 (UTC)

Edit request from 67.187.98.9, 14 June 2011[edit]

"or as the Aztecs called it, a "tribute."

I highly doubt the Aztecs spoke Latin, but I could be crazy.

67.187.98.9 (talk) 17:50, 14 June 2011 (UTC)

Thanks, nice catch! The old link was dead, so when I found the source I reworded it. I think someone was trying to be a little too close to the source text. ~ Amory (utc) 23:44, 14 June 2011 (UTC)

Spelling[edit]

A Google search on CHOCALATE returns 5 million hits. Is this just a mis-spelling, or a genuine variation? It ought to be included in the diambiguation, but that is locked

109.144.246.87 (talk) 22:37, 5 July 2011 (UTC)

Vase Image[edit]

Describing the seated individual on the Maya vase painting as a "chief" is incorrect. It would be more accurate to describe them as a "lord" or "ajaw." Furthermore, in depictions such as this one it is common for the seated individual to be receiving gifts. The bowl of chocolate was thus likely given to the lord by the kneeling individual. Rather than "forbidding" the kneeling individual from touching the bowl, it seems more likely that the depicted hand gesture is simply a motion accompanying speech. The caption as depicted -"A Mayan chief forbids a person to touch a jar of chocolate"- should be accompanied by a reference to a scholarly source if that is indeed the interpretation of an epigrapher who has studied the vase. Otherwise, a more accurate caption would read "A Maya lord accepts a bowl of chocolate." — Preceding unsigned comment added by Blackliota (talkcontribs) 01:14, 29 July 2011 (UTC)

Fermentation?[edit]

How are the beans fermented? Is water added, yeast or bacteria? What happens chemically during fermentation? Do we get ethanol or lactic acid? AxelBoldt (talk) 21:08, 1 August 2011 (UTC)

Photos Abstract Darrell_Greenwood (talk) 01:52, 2 August 2011 (UTC)
Thanks! Maybe we should add some of that information to the article. AxelBoldt (talk) 22:36, 2 August 2011 (UTC)

QUESTION: Does Fermentation actually improve the flavour? Or is it done to help remove the shell? 24.85.227.243 (talk) 04:19, 23 August 2011 (UTC)

Fermentation is required for flavor. There's a lot of sources, page 88 of this [1] document talks about this and seems to be authoritative. --Wtshymanski (talk) 14:00, 23 August 2011 (UTC)

I grow my own chocolate in Guatemala and I do not ferment it just sun dry toast,peel the skin and grind. Wouldnt fermentation take out all the goodness?----cacaocreena

Redundent text[edit]

The HISTORY section contains the following text:

The Aztec adaptation of the drink was a bitter, frothy, spicy drink called xocolatl, made much the same way as the Mayan chocolate drinks. It was often seasoned with vanilla, chile pepper, and achiote, and was believed to fight fatigue, which is probably attributable to the theobromine content, a mood enhancer. Because cacao would not grow in the dry central Mexican highlands and had to be imported, chocolate was an important luxury good throughout the Aztec empire, and cocoa beans were often used as currency.[16]

In the New World, chocolate was consumed in a bitter, spicy drink called xocoatl, and was often flavored with vanilla, chili pepper, and achiote (known today as annatto).[17] Xocoatl was believed to fight fatigue, a belief that is probably attributable to the theobromine content. Chocolate was also an important luxury good throughout pre-Columbian Mesoamerica, and cacao beans were often used as currency.[18] For example, the Aztecs used a system in which one turkey cost one hundred cacao beans and one fresh avocado was worth three beans.[19] South American and European cultures have used cocoa to treat diarrhea for hundreds of years.[20]

I think it should read as follows:

The Aztec adaptation of the drink was a bitter, frothy, spicy drink called xocolatl, made much the same way as the Mayan chocolate drinks. It was often seasoned with vanilla, chile pepper, and achiote (known today as annatto)[16], and was believed to fight fatigue, which is probably attributable to the theobromine content, a mood enhancer. Because cacao would not grow in the dry central Mexican highlands and had to be imported, chocolate was an important luxury good throughout the Aztec empire, and cocoa beans were often used as currency.[17][18] For example, the Aztecs used a system in which one turkey cost one hundred cacao beans and one fresh avocado was worth three beans.[19] South American and European cultures have used cocoa to treat diarrhea for hundreds of years.[20]

Footnotes [16] and [17] would have to be switched if this change is made.

68.127.148.79 (talk) 20:25, 2 October 2011 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done Redundancy has been edited out. Darrell_Greenwood (talk) 02:45, 6 April 2012 (UTC)

Producers[edit]

Barry Callebaut is the largest producer of chocolate in the world, not Mars or Hersey as the article states unsourced. Source: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704415104576065653793194740.html Why is this article semi-protected anyway? it's about chocolate fgs :o--85.151.204.175 (talk) 08:03, 31 October 2011 (UTC)

  • The semi-protection is due to massive repeated vandalism, up to not being able to maintain the page. Several attempts to lift the semi-protection failed (the vandalism returned each time). Eldar (talk) 22:28, 31 October 2011 (UTC)
This might even be true, though hard to verify, if the ranking is "Company that sells the most chocolate" and not "Company that sells the most stuff (including chocolate)". Kraft and the others are much larger companies but have many other product lines; Callebaut also sells fruit snacks and hard candy. I wish we had a better reference than an off-hand line in the WSJ, thoguh. Soemthing ranking chocolate sales by company, perhaps? Can Google find this for me? --Wtshymanski (talk) 16:39, 1 November 2011 (UTC)

Edit request on 29 November 2011[edit]

please add si:චොකලට් to the language bar since we have translated some part of this article into sinhala.

නීසා (talk) 16:22, 29 November 2011 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done, thanks--Jac16888 Talk 17:00, 29 November 2011 (UTC)

Resource regarding Planetary boundaries and Holocene extinction[edit]

From Talk:Effects of global warming ...

See Climate change and agriculture and Effect of climate change on plant biodiversity.


141.218.36.41 (talk) 22:16, 6 December 2011 (UTC)

Edit request on 9 January 2012[edit]

Improvements to storage of chocolate (with source)

Trivial change: "Ideal temperature for storing chocolate is 16-18 C, but will do very well up to 24 C."

Optional non-formatted change: Fat bloom is caused by storage temperature fluctuating or exceeding 24 C while sugar bloom is caused by temperature below 15 C or excess humidity. To distinguish between different types of bloom, one can rub the surface of the chocolate lightly, and if the bloom disappears, it is fat bloom. One can get rid of bloom by re-tempering the chocolate or using it for anything that requires melting the chocolate.

Source: Frederic Bau (Editor), Clay McLachlan (Photographer), Pierre Herme (Foreword), L'Ecole du Grand Chocolat Valrhona (Contributor) (2011). Cooking With Chocolate: Essential Recipes and Techniques. Paris: Flammarion, S.A. pp. 147. ISBN 978-2-08-020081-5 80.220.71.129 (talk) 08:13, 9 January 2012 (UTC)

Done. --Wtshymanski (talk) 15:47, 9 January 2012 (UTC)

Messed up links to other languages[edit]

Can someone explain why the last edit [2] degraded all the links to chocolate articles in other languages to a bunch of red links at the bottom? Mikael Häggström (talk) 12:43, 1 February 2012 (UTC)

The reference was entered twice. When I removed the second entry (in External Links), the problem disappeared. While checking that it had disappeared I saw interaction between the two references briefly, but I could not see how or why they were interacting, the formatting appeared OK. Darrell_Greenwood (talk) 21:50, 1 February 2012 (UTC)
Thanks for fixing the problem Face-smile.svg Mikael Häggström (talk) 05:35, 3 February 2012 (UTC)

Tempering section and chocolate melting point[edit]

In the tempering section, the citation for the six crystalline forms of cocoa butter (citation #61) appears to link to an About.com page that does not actually mention anything about crystalline forms whatsoever. I would like to point out a more suitable reference taken from the following paper (which involved x-ray crystallography):

Loisel et al. "Phase Transitions and Polymorphism of Cocoa Butter". JAOCS, Vol. 75, no. 4 (1998)

On page 426, Table 2 gives seven separate references for the melting point of each form of cocoa butter. The current Wikipedia article closely resembles "reference 10" from Loisel et al 1998 (Wille, R.L., and E.S. Lutton, Polymorphism of CB, Ibid. 43:491–496 1966) in both temperatures and labeling conventions, and so it may be the most appropriate as a replacement citation for #61 on the Wikipedia page.

The I-VI labeling convention seems to be the most popular, and so I would definitely recommend sticking with it. In addition, the Loisel 1998 paper should probably also be cited somewhere in the body of the text, for those interested in the current scientific consensus on the melting point of various stages of cocoa butter. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 108.41.13.42 (talk) 05:37, 24 February 2012 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done -- Added reference, Phase Transitions and Polymorphism of Cocoa Butter, to Tempering section. Darrell_Greenwood (talk) 02:31, 6 April 2012 (UTC)

Duplication in 1st Paragraph[edit]

There are two sentences in the 1st paragraph that are essentially identical.

1st Paragraph: Cacao has been cultivated for at least three millennia in Mexico, Central and South America.

5th Paragraph: Theobroma cacao, native to Mexico, Central and South America, has been cultivated for at least three millennia in that region.

I would recommend removing the second one entirely, and combining the rest of the 5th paragraph with another one. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 128.175.37.164 (talk) 14:16, 5 April 2012 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done Darrell_Greenwood (talk) 00:19, 6 April 2012 (UTC)

Edit request on 17 December 2012[edit]

please erase all the wrong thing which can not be proved or have any justification in nahuatl launguange. Make the article a whole. Please I have studied the cultural history of chocolate for many years. I hurts me to se all these wrong things to continue. My written English is bad so please do. And I am not allowed to due to your rules.

Chocolate (pronounced /ˈtʃɒklɨt/ ( listen) or /ˈtʃɒkəlɨt/) comprises a number of raw and processed foods produced from the seed of the tropical Theobroma cacao tree. Cacao has been cultivated for at least three millennia in Mexico, Central America, with its earliest documented use around 1500 BC. The majority of the Mesoamerican people made chocolate beverages, including the Aztecs, who made it into a beverage known as cacahuaatl '[ref]Fray Alonso de Molina: Vocabulario en Lengua Castellana y Mexicana y Mexicana y Castellana. The seeds of the cacao tree have an intense bitter taste, and must be fermented to develop the flavor.

If you disagree on erasing xocoatl, please look at the next section Etymology or read the sources. It is true xocoatl never appears in classical nahuatl sources. Some of the articles are written of really good scholars. I have put my reference on the very best nahuatl-spanish dictonary in italics. FIND THE BOOK IN A LIBERERY

Not done: please make your request in a "change X to Y" format. and please cite a reliable source. A non-English book title followed by "FIND THE BOOK IN A LIBERERY" isn't quite sufficient, I'm afraid. Pol430 talk to me 19:29, 17 December 2012 (UTC)

Select Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitor.[edit]

so pretty much there is chemicals in chocolate that help calm people down. these are called SSRI's. I found a page that goes into depth about the effects. the site name is Dark Chocolate and Serotonin. if we can make mention of that in paragraph 3. --Toad573 (talk) 22:05, 30 March 2013 (UTC)

Mexicans didn't know about milk???[edit]

"The Europeans sweetened and fattened it by adding refined sugar and milk, two ingredients unknown to the Mexicans." — Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.167.4.100 (talk) 19:03, 4 April 2013 (UTC)

I don't think that they had any domesticated animal from which they could produce and consume milk until after the arrival of Europeans. Edgeweyes (talk) 19:19, 4 April 2013 (UTC)

Of course there was not any animal to get milk... got milk? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 148.206.54.47 (talk) 19:34, 25 April 2013 (UTC)

Chocolate still contains its alkaloids or it is no longer chocolate?[edit]

Both themes are mentioned but unrelated to each other. Chocolate solids contains theobromine... (1), and cocoa solids are substituted to lower costs (2). The implication is that substituted chocolate contains no alkaloids, but it is not called chocolate... It should be clearer how alkaloids are handled nowadays in this Islamic Era particularly since chocolate has changed flavor so much it is evident people consumme it less and less every day. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 98.113.167.4 (talk) 18:57, 2 June 2013 (UTC)

Proposed merge with Melting of chocolate[edit]

I really don't think the melting of chocolate needs to be a separate article, especially since some of the content seems to be covered in the Chocolate#Tempering section. The rest of the article could be merged into that section or a new section created. Sarahj2107 (talk) 12:50, 19 June 2013 (UTC)

  • Support merge --Stfg (talk) 15:48, 23 November 2013 (UTC)

New History of foods[edit]

Is a very serious recent page. Iniatlly, from Spain, but the common History make it interesting for all countries Thanks Egballes (talk) 13:01, 23 November 2013 (UTC)

Not done for now: The link you provided fails to open. www.foodsfromspain.com does open, so this must be an error in the link, not a DNS or internet error. Please could you double-check your link? --Stfg (talk) 15:52, 23 November 2013 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 30 December 2013[edit]

Please add a link to Children in cocoa production. Thank you so much. Hillmon7500 (talk) 04:14, 30 December 2013 (UTC)

Hillmon7500 (talk) 04:14, 30 December 2013 (UTC)

Already done - take a look at the "See also" line under Production. --ElHef (Meep?) 16:12, 30 December 2013 (UTC)

Possible copyright problem[edit]

This article has been revised as part of a large-scale clean-up project of multiple article copyright infringement. (See the investigation subpage) Earlier text must not be restored, unless it can be verified to be free of infringement. For legal reasons, Wikipedia cannot accept copyrighted text or images borrowed from other web sites or printed material; such additions must be deleted. Contributors may use sources as a source of information, but not as a source of sentences or phrases. Accordingly, the material may be rewritten, but only if it does not infringe on the copyright of the original or plagiarize from that source. Please see our guideline on non-free text for how to properly implement limited quotations of copyrighted text. Wikipedia takes copyright violations very seriously. Moonriddengirl (talk) 01:52, 9 March 2014 (UTC)

chocolate[edit]

chocolate is made out of cocoa beans.Cocoa pods grow in rain forests and explorers come to find the cocoa pods.When you break a cocoa pod,you see white you can make soap out of it,it's named coca butter if you want to get it.Now as you we are also including the Aztecs

AZTECS Aztecs lived a long time ago.What they did is believed in a different god so they did this:some wanted to die because the believed in a god.They had lots of pyramids and that's where they died:the Aztec king is the one who takes there hearts out and at the end they eat the arms and legs

DIFFERENT TYPES OF CHOCOLATE marvelous creations is where it has lots of sweets in it twirl is where it has normal chocolate inside with two mini bars in one pack Crunchie because it's called Crunchie because it's so crunchy Buttons is chocolate that is shaped into buttons

EXTRAS chocolate is very yummy and most people like mint,mint is my favorite too but back to the facts buisness you can change normal chocolate to mint with a mint recipe — Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.180.194.55 (talk) 20:08, 2 April 2014 (UTC)

Typo in "Religious and Cultural Links"[edit]

The word Easter in the first sentence is repeated, will users who can please change it? Last Waterbender (talk) 14:24, 26 April 2014 (UTC)

Cocolate and Cocoa[edit]

I have recently been hearing of cocoa that is not "heat-treated". On wiki (at Chocolate or here) there is no clarity regarding the process of fermenting, roasting and grinding to a powder for onward processing. However, in this blog for instance there is detail of both commercial, low temperature, and Dutch processing methods for cocoa/chocolate http://nourishmylife.wordpress.com/2013/04/24/raw-cacao-vs-cocoa/ Is there more? Are there products made that do not ferment the coaacoa for example or do not roast it? LookingGlass (talk) 10:16, 28 April 2014 (UTC)

Dark chocolate European regulations[edit]

I've clicked the link for the European rules [28] and the 35% cocoa solid content is a requirement for a product to be considered chocolate, not dark chocolate. Please remove the statement saying that according to European regulations, a chocolate with at least 35% cocoa solids is dark (the article is semi-protected). — Preceding unsigned comment added by 194.102.61.162 (talk) 11:54, 11 June 2014 (UTC)

Massive and Gross Errors[edit]

First of all every reference to cocoa solids in the regulations of Chocolate in the article is 100% incorrect. Because ALL regulations define cocoa solids to be BOTH Cocoa Powder and Cocoa Butter, but the first paragraph in this article wrongly defines Cocoa Solid is Cocoa Powder.

Example this sentence "European Union regulations require dark chocolate to have at least 60% cocoa solids, milk chocolate 25%, and white chocolate none" The regulation DEFINES cocoa solids as BOTH cocoa powder and cocoa butter, not just cocoa powder like this article states. The same is true for all such sentence in the article reference regulations. There are other gross errors in the article as well. In fact all of the article about Chocolate on Wikipedia is are full of gross errors.

--98.208.19.245 (talk) 08:31, 18 July 2014 (UTC)

You are invited to edit this article.--Wtshymanski (talk) 14:39, 22 July 2014 (UTC)

Cacao Varieties[edit]

I wanted to add a section on the Nacional varietal, which appears to be a relatively newly discovered type. See for example: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/12/dining/12chocolate.html?_r=0

In light of this, the statement in that section that "criollo is the rarest and most expensive cocoa on the market" is dubious (and isn't in any of the citations nearby). Indeed, one of the citations seems to be to a decrepit blog that just has links to criollo cacao for sale.

71.237.73.75 (talk) 14:27, 11 August 2014 (UTC)

Pronunciation[edit]

Why is the British pronunciation being given to the exclusion of the American/Canadian pronunciation? It's offensive, especially when one considers that 350-400 million share the pronunciation that's not given compared to fewer than 200 million who share the British one. If the minority (=British) pronunciation must be given, then surely the majority (=American & Canadian) should be given along side it. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 108.87.122.6 (talk) 03:55, 17 August 2014 (UTC)

Caption from image in Manufacturers section needs correcting[edit]

I seem to have noticed that the image in the "Manufacturers" section is depicting a box of Chocolate Hazelnuts from Sprüngli (not Lindt as incorrectly mentioned). If this could be corrected from:

Lindt chocolates in presentation box for the Switzerland Wiki Loves Monuments Awards Ceremony (2013)

to

Sprüngli chocolates in presentation box for the Switzerland Wiki Loves Monuments Awards Ceremony (2013)

Cheers.

Semi-protected edit request on 5 September 2014[edit]

The Nahuatl spelling for chocolate is chokolatl not chocolatl. "Chokol" is "hot " "atl" is water.

Reference:

"... And words such as coyote and chocolate, which have been adopted by both the English and Spanish languages are Nahuatl in their origin (derived from koyotl and chokolatl, respectively). ..."

http://www.tlahui.com/tlahui2/andrea.htm

http://theinnofurak.yuku.com/topic/1099/The-Savran-Language#.VAoDf_ldXh4

Also referenced here on Wikipedia:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chocolate_(color)

Martin Nathan (talk) 18:46, 5 September 2014 (UTC)

As above , So how did they render their word for "chocolate" in English letters? Is this just a case of different transcriptions of Nahuatl into English letters? --Wtshymanski (talk) 18:01, 9 November 2010 (UTC) --Wtshymanski (talk) 14:00, 10 September 2014 (UTC)
Red information icon with gradient background.svg Not done: please establish a consensus for this alteration before using the {{edit semi-protected}} template. Cannolis (talk) 02:28, 14 September 2014 (UTC)

proposal chocolate production infographic[edit]

I would like to use one infographic made by me about the chocolate production. I think is missing something similar right now and we know that the visual fruition of information supports the learning --131.175.28.132 (talk) 14:57, 1 December 2014 (UTC)


I would like to add this infographic in this page because I think it's important to learn something by using visual information.

I don't think this diagram adds enough EV to make it worth the page space it will take up. Everything after "5" on the path, for example, is nonsense or confusing. --Wtshymanski (talk) 15:21, 1 December 2014 (UTC)