Talk:Christmas card

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Holidays / Christmas  (Rated C-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Holidays, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Holidays on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by the Christmas task force (marked as Top-importance).
 
WikiProject Christianity / Christmas (Rated C-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Christianity, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Christianity on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by Christmas task force (marked as Top-importance).
 

move[edit]

This should not have been moved here. "Christmas Card" with two upper case letters is its own disamibugation. -- Zoe


The description here seems overly Jesus-centric; many Christmas cards in the US at least are based rather in the Santa Claus tradition. --Brion 03:43 Jan 20, 2003 (UTC)



In Japan, Christmas cards sometimes have pictures of Santa being crucified. :-)

I was devasted to hear that this is probably an urban myth. I suspect that if such a thing does nowadays exist, it is a deliberate joke based oin the original myth or story. Funny how many of the best stories end up not being true, isn't it? <sigh> Nevilley 17:48 Jan 24, 2003 (UTC)

There are Christmas Cards and there are christmas cards--know what i mean? this is not a proper name!

[I love this place. I love all disputes. I hope no one is angry!]

Arthur



I'm not angry, just confused. :) "Christmas" is a proper name. "Card" is not. Ergo, "Christmas card". (Except for the obscure album title, of course.) --Brion 03:56 Jan 20, 2003 (UTC)

So what's your problem? The generic item is here. We're fine, leave it alone. -- Zoe

Which Queen Mary?[edit]

Is this Queen Mary the Mary of Teck, wife of George V, UK? Make clear? Cheers JackyR 20:22, 23 December 2005 (UTC)

Oh, good point! Certainly not the first, I don't think she had much leisure time. Fixed. (With link.) Lindmere 18:05, 30 December 2005 (UTC)

Commercial and Personal Websites[edit]

Not surprisingly, this page attracts a fair amount of linkspam from ecard and other card purveyors. I added an External Links section for historical archives and other material that does not relate directly to the article, but are relevant to the topic. I would suggest that noncommercial ecard and other sites are only worthy of links if they would significantly enhance the reader's understanding of past history or current trends in Christmas cards. Lindmere 16:43, 27 August 2007 (UTC)

Snowy weather traditionally depicted in British cards a result of volcano activity in Victorian times[edit]

I've heard that the idea we have in Britain of Christmas being a time of snow was established during Victorian times, when the cards first became popular, and in writings by Dickens, was due to unusually cold weather at that time due to the eruption of a large volcano (Krakatoa?). In normal times, snow is quite rare on Christmas day in England, at least. Another thing I've heard is that this was due to Christmas being held in what we would now call January, prior to the change to the modern calendar. 78.147.242.123 (talk) 21:47, 6 April 2009 (UTC)