Talk:Chronic stress

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Magnesium stress[edit]

The magnesium stress connection doesn't have a reference cited.

No sources[edit]

This article has no sources at all.

- 75.16.72.187 (talk) 03:02, 14 December 2007 (UTC)

Could we put magnesium into the article somewhere? Baiter (talk) 04:07, 16 April 2008 (UTC)

I'm removing the random list of non-relevant, non-comprehensive causes for chronic stress. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Laocoont (talkcontribs) 00:04, 10 November 2008 (UTC)

I would like to delete the short list of ways to lower stress and add a longer more effective which contains steps provn to work —Preceding unsigned comment added by Kmsunnyd (talkcontribs) 16:00, 25 March 2010 (UTC)

Adding Images[edit]

I will be adding images, unless anyone disagrees? Gdudycha (talk) 18:49, 22 March 2010 (UTC)Gdudycha

Looks good :-) 75.252.76.97 (talk) 04:58, 12 April 2010 (UTC)

Editing Lead[edit]

This lead is very lacking and could use alot of help. It is not comprehensive and does not meet the Wikipedia Featured Article standards. I will be working to edit this. J.ramsdill (talk) 03:02, 1 April 2010 (UTC)J.Ramsdill

As we (myself, Kaja, and Ahouansivi) begin working to improve this page, we are going to begin our focus on the lead, structure, and writing-style/quality of this work.

- - - - —Preceding unsigned comment added by IsabelD (talkcontribs) 14:33, 1 April 2010 (UTC)

At present this lead section is poorly written, as it does not let the reader know what is coming in terms of the article's broader content. IsabelD (talk) 14:37, 1 April 2010 (UTC)

I am working as a group along with Isabel, who posted a min ago, and another student to revise this article beginning with the lead. With the intent to further this article's credible status and in hope to reach "Good" or "Featured" standing. I agree with Isabel that this lead section is lacking. We have begun to draft our revisions and will be implementing those ideas soon. Kajasimpson (talk) 15:34, 1 April 2010 (UTC) Kajasimpson

- - - -

This is our group's (Isabel, Kaja, and Ahouansivi) suggestion for new/revised text for the lead:

Chronic stress is an unfortunate reality for many people who struggle to manage the multiple and oftentimes conflicting demands of work, school, relationships, family, finances, and other pressures that are commonplace in modern-day industrialized societies. Recognized by experts across a range of physical- and mental health- disciplines as a complex phenomenon that simultaneously affects our biology/physiology, psychological/cognitive functioning, and relationship stability/well-being, chronic stress is something that calls for equally complex and diverse solutions/treatments in its effective reduction and management.

This article begins by reviewing what we know about chronic stress in terms of how it affects us, focusing attention across this bio-psycho-social continuum of experience(s). It then offers what we can do to combat chronic stress across the same continuum – from exercise and medications (bio-) to behavioral management strategies and stress and psychotherapies (psycho-) to relational and support systems/strategies (social-) known to mediate and/or ameliorate this common – but serious – problem. It concludes with a list of scientific and practical resources for further review and application. 71.34.60.188 (talk) 00:04, 8 April 2010 (UTC)

- - - -

This is our group's (Isabel, Kaja, and Ahouansivi) revised suggestion for new/revised text for the lead:

Chronic stress is an unfortunate reality for many people who struggle to manage the multiple and oftentimes conflicting demands of work, school, relationships, family, finances, and other pressures that are commonplace in modern-day industrialized societies. Recognized by experts across a range of physical- and mental health- disciplines as a complex phenomenon that simultaneously affects our biology/physiology, psychological/cognitive functioning, and relationship stability/well-being, chronic stress is something that calls for equally complex and diverse solutions/treatments in its effective reduction and management (Sutton).

This article begins by reviewing what we know about chronic stress in terms of how it affects us, focusing attention across this bio-psycho-social continuum of experience(s). It then offers what we can do to combat chronic stress across the same continuum – from exercise and medications (bio-) to behavioral management strategies and stress and psychotherapies (psycho-) to relational and support systems/strategies (social-) known to mediate and/or ameliorate this common – but serious – problem. It concludes with a list of scientific and practical resources for further review and application.

[submitted by IsabelD] IsabelD (talk) 23:21, 11 April 2010 (UTC)

Treatments/ Causes of stress[edit]

I think there are other effective treatments besides what has been listed. I will also work on making the list a little longer. Also included should be common causes of stress. We could work on changing that as well. - Kmsunnyd (3/31/2010) —Preceding unsigned comment added by 75.73.207.121 (talk) 03:11, 1 April 2010 (UTC) Also (J.ramsdill) as well as Kmsunnyd

One simple treatment of stress that we can all do is to laugh. "Laughter is a healing activity" according to Mike Adams, the editor of the medical journal NaturalNews. (see the site www.naturalnews.com/chronic_stress.html —Preceding unsigned comment added by Ahouansivi1 (talkcontribs) 16:08, 1 April 2010 (UTC)

In the first sentence under Relaxing, revise the text to say: “There are a variety of ways to increase a sense(s) of calm and well-being, which are commonly grouped together as “relaxation techniques” or strategies. From guided imagery to yoga to square-breathing to biofeedback, these techniques and strategies are relatively easy to learn and apply in our everyday lives. We can engage in these techniques and strategies on a regular basis as part of our healthy everyday routines, and we can purposefully use these techniques and strategies in response to a stressful event or situation as it occurs.” It could also be good to introduce sleep hygiene strategies here, for the reason that insomnia (or not getting enough sleep) makes stress worse. From some of the things that I have read so far, we could say something like: “There are a variety of strategies that people can use to help themselves to sleep better, which in turn enables us to handle stress better. For example, having a set bedtime and wake-up time, not drinking alcohol or caffeine for several hours before bed, and getting up and doing something during the night if you cannot sleep (versus tossing-and-turning in bed) are all easy-to-implement behaviors that research has shown to work.” —Preceding unsigned comment added by Ahouansivi1 (talkcontribs) 22:20, 7 April 2010 (UTC)

Biology Section[edit]

I believe that the entire Biology section should be re-written in a more understandable manner. I'm not sure if it's just me, but it gets all scrambled in my head as I am reading it.--Gdudycha (talk) 04:09, 2 April 2010 (UTC)gdudycha

In the first paragraph under Biology, revise the first sentence to read: “Animals exposed to stressful events and/or sequences of events (i.e. strains), especially those that they cannot control, manifest several physiological responses in their neurological and endocrine systems.” Then, after outlining/highlighting some of the things that we know about animal research, we should add in a bridge to what we know about humans. For example: “Research regarding the biological and physiological effects of stress informs and overlaps with what we know about the impact(s) of stress on human beings. Anybody who has ever gotten butterflies in his/her stomach when s/he was nervous, experienced insomnia because they were worried about something and could not “turn off” their brains/thoughts, and/or gotten a headache during finals week knows that our minds and our bodies are in constant dialogue.” From there, then, highlight (and of course, cite/reference) some of the human researchAhouansivi1 (talk) 23:28, 7 April 2010 (UTC)

- - - -

This is our group's (Isabel, Kaja, and Ahouansivi) revised suggestion for new/revised text for this section:

In the first paragraph under Biology, revise the first sentence to read:

Animals exposed to stressful events and/or sequences of events (i.e. strains), especially those that they cannot control, manifest several physiological responses in their neurological and endocrine systems (Sapolsky).

Then, after outlining/highlighting some of the things that we know about animal research, we should add in a bridge to what we know about humans. For example:

Research regarding the biological and physiological effects of stress informs and overlaps with what we know about the impact(s) of stress on human beings (McEwen). Anybody who has ever gotten butterflies in his/her stomach when s/he was nervous, experienced insomnia because they were worried about something and could not “turn off” their brains/thoughts, and/or gotten a headache during finals week knows that our minds and our bodies are in constant dialogue (Sutton).

From there, then, highlight (and of course, cite/reference) some of the human research.

[submitted by IsabelD] IsabelD (talk) 23:23, 11 April 2010 (UTC)

Revising the article[edit]

It's a great idea to revise this article, it really can use it. However, some of the proposed texts above are not very encyclopedic. I recommend that your read WP:MOS and some of the articles linked from there to get an idea of what is needed. Happy editing! --Crusio (talk) 07:10, 8 April 2010 (UTC)

- - - -

This is our group's (Isabel, Kaja, and Ahouansivi) other suggestions for new/revised text:

In the first paragraph under Treatment, revise the first sentence to a couple of sentences that are more comprehensive:

Consistent with the notion that chronic stress is a bio-psycho-social phenomenon, so too should its effective management and treatment (Sutton). Attention to our biology/physiology (McEwen; Rozanski et al.), psychological health and cognitive functioning (Hammen et al.), and social/relational experiences is better than relying on any one ‘solution’ per se (Korn et al.). Indeed, healthy lifestyles (and healthy stress management) do not rest on the carrying out of any single behavior, supplement or medication; they encompass a broad range of healthy sequences that cumulate into the whole being more than the some of the parts (Sutton).

In the first sentence under Relaxing, revise the text to say: There are a variety of ways to increase a sense(s) of calm and well-being, which are commonly grouped together as “relaxation techniques” or strategies. From guided imagery to yoga to square-breathing to biofeedback, these techniques and strategies are relatively easy to learn and apply in our everyday lives. We can engage in these techniques and strategies on a regular basis as part of our healthy everyday routines, and we can purposefully use these techniques and strategies in response to a stressful event or situation as it occurs.

It could also be good to introduce sleep hygiene strategies here, for the reason that insomnia (or not getting enough sleep) makes stress worse. From some of the things that I have read so far, we could say something like:

There are a variety of strategies that people can use to help themselves to sleep better, which in turn enables us to handle stress better. For example, having a set bedtime and wake-up time, not drinking alcohol or caffeine for several hours before bed, and getting up and doing something during the night if you cannot sleep (versus tossing-and-turning in bed) are all easy-to-implement behaviors that research has shown to work.

In the first sentence(s) under Support Systems, revise the text to say:

Connecting with others through supportive networks, systems, and relationships is another good way to combat stress. Whether through informal means (e.g., socializing with friends, playing organized sports, participating in hobby-clubs) or formal/professional means (e.g., group therapy), the experience of being with others serves to reduce stress. Being with others offers a good context(s) to talk about, give/receive support for stress, and sometimes just having fun can help us to forget about our everyday worries for awhile (Sutton).

At the conclusion of the article, begin a resource list and say:

The following resources represent further scientific readings and current-knowledge regarding chronic stress, and practical resources for use in our everyday lives.

Then, we could divide up the resources section into two parts. One part could have the scientific knowledge (e.g., research papers), and other could have practical resources (e.g., web sites with links to supportive organizations).

Scientific Knowledge/Resources: Chumaeva,Nadja, Mirka Hintsanen, Niklas Ravaja, Markus Juonala, Olli T. Raitakari, and Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen. “Chronic Stress and the Development of Early Atherosclerosis: Moderating Effect of Endothelial Dysfunction and Impaired Arterial Elasticity.” International Journal on Environmental Research and Public Health 6.12 (2009): 2934–2949.

Hammen, Constance, Patricia Brennan, Danielle Keenan-Miller, Nicholas Hazel, and Jake Najman. “Chronic and Acute Stress, Gender, and Serotonin Transporter Gene–Environment Interactions Predicting Depression Symptoms in Youth.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 51.2 (2010): 180–187.

Korn, Leslie, Rebecca Logsdon, Navak Polissar, Alfredo Gomez-Beloz, Tiffany Waters, and Rudolph Rvser. “A Randomized Trial of a CAM Therapy for Stress Reduction in American Indian and Alaskan Native Family Caregivers.” The Gerontologist 49.3 (2009): 368-377.

McEwen, Bruce. “Physiology and neurobiology of stress and adaptation: central role of the brain.” Physiological Reviews 87.3 (2007): 873-904.

Ostiguy, Caroline, Mark A. Ellenbogen, Anne-Marie Linnen, Elaine F. Walker, Constance Hammen, and Sheilagh Hodgins. “Chronic Stress and Stressful Life Events in the Offspring of Parents with Bipolar Disorder.” Journal of Affective Disorders 114.1 (2009): 74–84.

Rozanski, Alan, James Blumenthal, Karina Davidson, Patrice Saab, and Laura Kubsansky. “The Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Management of Psychosocial Risk Factors in Cardiac Practice: The Emerging Field of Behavioral Cardiology”. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 45.5 (2005): 637-651.

Practical Resources: Sutton, Amy L., ed. Stress-related Disorders Sourcebook: Basic Consumer Health Information About Stress And Stress-related Disorders, Including Types of Stress, Sources of Acute And Chronic Stress, the Impact of Stress On the Body's Systems, And Mental And Emotional Health Problems Associated With Stress, Such As Depression, Anxiety Disorders, Substance Abuse, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, And Suicide; Along With Advice About Getting Help for Stress-related Disorders, Information About Stress Management Techniques, a Glossary of Stress-related Terms, And a Directory of Resources for Additional Help And Information. Array Detroit, MI: Omnigraphics, 2007.

[submitted by IsabelD] IsabelD (talk) 23:26, 11 April 2010 (UTC)

Effects of Stress[edit]

I have a paragraph or two, along with an image, I would like to add to the page about the effects of stress on the body.--Gdudycha (talk) 15:07, 8 April 2010 (UTC)

I edited this portion to not address the reader. To address the reader makes it "non-encyclopedic". It should read with facts to inform, not personally directed toward. I adjusted what I thought would work, without taking away from the point of reference. Kajasimpson (talk) 21:24, 12 April 2010 (UTC)

Symptoms[edit]

I would like to change the structure to the "Symptoms" section according the the layout guidelines. They prefer to minimize bullet points, so I will be changing it into a paragraph form.--Gdudycha (talk) 15:41, 8 April 2010 (UTC)

my contribution[edit]

started this article! — Preceding unsigned comment added by SteveNash11 (talkcontribs) 22:59, 4 July 2011 (UTC)

Very little information in this article.[edit]

I am just watching the teaching company course called "stress and your body" ( http://www.thegreatcourses.com/tgc/courses/course_detail.aspx?cid=1585 ), and this article should have much more information about how chronic stress is damaging the body. --152.94.59.5 (talk) 19:06, 6 September 2011 (UTC)

Adrenal fatigue[edit]

Adrenal fatigue is not a real medical condition, so stating that stress is "linked" to it is ridiculous. We should not be giving undue WP:WEIGHT to WP:FRINGE ideas. I should add that just because something has a source, does not mean it necessarily has to be in the article, as is claimed in the edit summaries. Yobol (talk) 14:54, 19 March 2014 (UTC)

You don't agree with the belief that their may be a link, so you've engaged in POV edit warring. The entry was cited. Here are some more that discuss the link between stress and the condition.

--evrik (talk) 15:10, 19 March 2014 (UTC)

No WP:MEDRS compliant source says it exists, so to say it does violates our guidelines. Yobol (talk) 15:15, 19 March 2014 (UTC)
Really?
  • Wilson, James (2001-01-01). Adrenal Fatigue: The 21st Century Stress Syndrome. Smart Publications. p. 361. ISBN 978-1890572150. 
Sure your not just cherry picking your facts? --evrik (talk) 15:18, 19 March 2014 (UTC)
(edit conflict)As per MEDRS, you need a review published in the biomedical literature, or a statement by a major medical or scientific body, for health-related information. None of the sources you bring are great and most of them are not acceptable. The sciencebasedmedicine source is OK, and it supports the statement that the medical consensus is that this is not a valid condition. The adrenalfatigue.org site is a WP:SPS and fails Wikipedia:Identifying_reliable_sources_(medicine)#Use_independent_sources. WebMD is suboptimal source but often OK; it to stands with the medical consensus on this issue. womentowomen also is WP:SPS and fails Wikipedia:Identifying_reliable_sources_(medicine)#Use_independent_sources. About.com is not acceptable for health-related information. Please respect WP:FRINGE and WP:MEDRS. Yobol is correct here. Jytdog (talk) 15:19, 19 March 2014 (UTC)
That book is by the leading proponent of the theory (same guy who runs the adrenalfatigue.org website); it too fails Wikipedia:Identifying_reliable_sources_(medicine)#Use_independent_sources. Jytdog (talk) 15:19, 19 March 2014 (UTC)