Talk:Cinema of Italy

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Improvement Drive[edit]

The article Culture of Italy has been listed to be improved on Wikipedia:This week's improvement drive. You can add your vote there if you would like to support the article.--Fenice 14:22, 9 August 2005 (UTC)

More on Fellini! Major omission. - —Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.186.161.15 (talkcontribs)

Agreed- Bertolucci and Visconti aren't here either. I created a stubby auteurs section, which I will expand soon (once I can find some of my film textbooks). - AKeen 17:39, 12 January 2007 (UTC)

Lumiere[edit]

I was of the impression Edison predated the Lumiere brothers. --NEMT 03:48, 3 September 2007 (UTC)

"The Frenchman Louis Lumiere is often credited as inventing the first motion picture camera in 1895. But in truth, several others had made similar inventions around the same time as Lumiere. What Lumiere invented was a portable motion-picture camera, film processing unit and projector called the Cinematographe, three functions covered in one invention. The Cinematographe made motion pictures very popular, and it could be better be said that Lumiere's invention began the motion picture era. In 1895, Lumiere and his brother were the first to present projected, moving, photographic, pictures to a paying audience of more that one person. The Lumiere brothers were not the first to project film. In 1891, the Edison company successfully demonstrated the Kinetoscope, which enabled one person at a time to view moving pictures. Later in 1896, Edison showed his improved Vitascope projector and it was the first commercially, successful, projector in the U.S."

I hope this answers the (by now, quite-old) question above. One could equally well refer to the Edison or the Lumiere apparatus as "the first", without much argument from credible sources. Raymondwinn (talk) 17:26, 9 January 2011 (UTC)