Talk:Cingulate cortex

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Paracingulate Cortex[edit]

Hi all,

I think wikipedia needs an entry on the paracingulate cortex. I am far from an expert on brain anatomy, so if you guys could help, that would be great. Tony 17:33, 13 June 2007 (UTC)


Hello, I completely agree. I'm a harvard trained doctor and I think that discussion is completely useless. It sounds like a neuroanatomy PhD student rambling on and on during a their dissertation defense. I would suggest at least discussing the 4 F's of the cingulate gyrus. Feeding, Fornicating, Fleeing, Fighting. That's what it does and that's why we care about it. It's often called the "rat brain." —Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.126.99.88 (talk) 14:11, 31 August 2007 (UTC)

Dear Harvard doctor! Several persons have done their best to write this article. Instead of criticizing with words like "rambling on and on", why don't you try to improve the article?Lova Falk (talk) 19:51, 15 May 2008 (UTC)

It might be useful to break the article down into sections such as anatomy, cell composition, function, and pathologies. This article seems to focus a lot on the history/naming schemes of the cingulate cortex, and not so much on other important aspects. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 96.52.134.104 (talk) 18:13, 6 January 2010 (UTC)

Perhaps the Harvard trained doctor was trained there a long, long time ago or perhaps s/he is confused with the hypothalamus but nobody thinks "the 4 Fs" are what the cingulate does. It's not so easy to write about what the cingulate does because it does not have 4 simple functions. It is especially involved in things like error detection, resolving emotional interference, and inhibition of amygdala reactivity. Lots of new evidence and a new Nature Neurosci review has probably put the final nail in the coffin of the old emotional-congnitive ventral-dorsal anatomical split theory. http://www.nature.com/nrn/journal/v12/n3/abs/nrn2994.html MBVECO (talk) 18:53, 30 March 2011 (UTC)

merged content from Cingulate gyrus and Cingulate sulcus[edit]

...as suggested at WPMED's cleanup listing. Neurotip (talk) 20:34, 27 March 2010 (UTC)

"Cingulate gyrus and schizophrenia" summarization[edit]

This section reads far too much like the abstract from a medical publication is not consistant with the content one would expect from an encyclopedia. The information provided in this section should be summarized in a manner more befitting the situation. While the information provided here is useful, it would find a better home on a page dealing more directly with schizophrenia rather than a page on a specific brain region (which should read more like a generalized overview).

Also, I'd suggest that the schizophrenia-specific section should be changed to "The cingulate cortex in dissorders" or something to that effect so information relating to other conditions like Depression can be added here.

If there's agreement that these would make positive changes, I could probably make the alterations myself. However, before making such a significant revision to what now accounts for a solid half of the total article input/feedback would be helpful Kernsters (talk) 22:13, 28 August 2012 (UTC)

I fully agree with you and I would be happy if you would make the alterations! Lova Falk talk 11:12, 30 August 2012 (UTC)

Error[edit]

One part of the summary seems to be wrong. There are no statisical difference in the white matter. The difference lies in the gray matter.

Summary

 The volume of the white and gray matter in the anterior cingulate gyrus was found to be lower
in schizophrenic patients 

Body

 A study of the volume of the gray and white matter in the anterior cingulate gyrus in
patients with schizophrenia and their healthy first and second degree relatives revealed no
significant difference in the volume of the white matter in the schizophrenic patients and their
healthy relatives (Costain et al, 2010).

— Preceding unsigned comment added by Haaaa (talkcontribs) 05:54, 15 April 2013 (UTC)

Thank you Haaaa for telling us! I now removed the word white out of the summary. Lova Falk talk 10:56, 23 June 2013 (UTC)
Thanks! Lova_Falk Haaaa (talk) 23:16, 23 June 2013 (UTC)

Hello, the section "Inputs of the anterior cingulate gyrus" talks about brodmann areas 26, 29 and 30 - but those are not anterior cingulate cortex; they are posterior cingulate cortex. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 209.6.200.115 (talk) 17:29, 26 July 2013 (UTC)