Talk:Ciriaco de' Pizzicolli

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Untitled[edit]

The proper name in Italian would be Ciriaco dei Pizzicolli (see also the eminent byzantinist Agostino Pertusi in La Caduta di Costantinopoli, 1976, Verona: Lorenzo Valla). However, I am not able to modify the page title.

The Italian language Wikipedia uses Ciriaco Pizzicolli as the name of the article. We use what is most commonly known in English. The Italian says Ciriaco d'Ancona as an alternate, not dei. Is this a modern shorthand of the original dei? -- Stbalbach 15:26, 9 December 2006 (UTC)
Ciriaco d'Ancona (meaning Ciriaco from Ancona) gives an indication about the town of origin; dei Pizzicolli or de' Pizzicolli (used indifferently) is the family name instead, so it should not be changed in passing between Italian and English. Pizzecolli (with e) however is not correct, as far as I can say looking at scholarly books in Italian. Where do you derive this spelling from? Ekrenor 19:44, 9 December 2006 (UTC)
btw, in my editing I had also corrected archaeologiast in archaeologist, judging that it was a typo (archaeologiast does not appear in any English dictionary that I have access to), but I see you reverted that back. So the choice of the word is deliberate?
Ok I changed the article from Pizzecolli to Pizzicolli per your suggestion. However, the Italian language Wikipedia uses Pizzecolli, and other language Wikipedia's use various spelling variations also. So I don't know which is the "correct" version, there may just be variations. In cases like this we need to establish which is the most commonly used in English speaking countries by looking at Google, other encyclopedias, etc.. Also fixed the spelling of archeology. -- Stbalbach 13:30, 10 December 2006 (UTC)
You're right: it could well be a simple spelling variation, which was very common at the time particularly with names. I suggested "dei Pizzicolli" because that is what I found on Pertusi's book (cited above; the name dei Pizzicolli or de' Pizzicolli appears at pages XVII, tome A; 194, 228, tome B). Of course I do not know which is the most commonly used form in English. I can point out, however, that on this English book: "D. Nicolle - Constantinople 1453 (the end of Byzantium); Osprey Publishing (2000)" (which I do not think qualifies as a scholarly publication, but still looks like a reasonably good booklet) the name is cited at pag. 13 as Ciriaco de Pizzicolli, better known as 'Ciriaco of Ancona' (sic). Anyway, the spelling is not extremely important to me, and I will not complain if you prefer to keep it Pizzecolli instead; it had simply happened that I had tried to modify the title myself discovering that I could not, so I decided to notify it on the talk page. Thank you for your very fast answer, by the way. Ekrenor 15:32, 10 December 2006 (UTC)

BBC4 yesterday seemingly asserted there's only one known portrait of him, but we are showing two[edit]

Unless I somehow misheard, BBC4 yesterday (Archaeology: A Secret History; presented by archaeologist Richard Miles) seemingly asserted that there is only one known portrait of him, but we are currently showing two. (Note: as I live in the Republic of Ireland, I can't check my memory of the BBC4 programme by replaying it using BBC iPlayer, but editors living in the UK presumably can; if it's my memory which is at fault, my apologies). The colourless relief appears to be the same as the one shown on BBC4, but the coloured fresco was not shown, and I note that it's dated 1459, 4 years after Pizzicolli's death in 1455. Can anybody clarify any of this? Tlhslobus (talk) 04:05, 1 May 2013 (UTC)