Talk:Clipping (computer graphics)

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Is Clipping important outside of designing computer games, such as producing animated films? If so, this would be good stuff for the article.--ChrisJMoor 02:00, 12 January 2006 (UTC)

It is quite pointless and also a bit contraproductive to redirect Sutherland-Hodgman to this article, while the algorithm is not discussed at all. Leaving an empty link is probably more useful, as it might encourage somebody to write a specific article. — Ylai 09:57, 3 May 2006 (UTC)

Should there be a mention of the use of the term "clipping" to describe environmental collision detection? "No Clipping" is commonly, if erroneously, used to deswcribe the ability of a player's character to pass through rendered objects.--71.146.67.207 07:19, 14 July 2006 (UTC)

Clipping vs culling[edit]

This page is actually not entirely accurate, it seems to confuse clipping with frustum culling, and back-face culling with occlusion culling. I'd update it, but I don't have the time.

Solra Bizna 10:24, 16 November 2005 (UTC)

Really needs an update to actually be about 'clipping' (ie polygon clipping) rather than culling etc.. I'm not an expert (hence why i'm looking it up) - so I can't really do it... 150.237.47.4 10:51, 24 November 2006 (UTC)

Wow, I'm truly disappointed that, in 2010, nobody still tackled this issue. I might want to add this to my todo list. The paragraph "Importance of clipping in video games" is still terrible by all standpoints, not to mention the lack of sources.
MaxDZ8 talk 16:18, 28 June 2010 (UTC)

Mameri and Nascimento[edit]

Is it really worth mentioning Mameri and Nascimento? I looked at the paper, and it seems something that would be immediately obvious to anybody designing a renderer for 2D or 2.5D games. Was this writeup actually published anywhere? --CTho 02:34, 14 March 2007 (UTC)

Answer: Why not??? Their technical sketch may be a good starting point for people who are new to game development. It could serve as an excellent practical example as how culling (what this article is about, really) can speed up the game loop. If not worth mentioning in the article, I believe a reference to it should be included in the algorithms session, for the sake of completeness.

It should be merged because if a person is going through clipping (computer graphics) and wants to have a look at algorithms he doesnt have to search again. in the same article he can find algorithms and it would be time saving. I know the article will become lengthy but the inclusion of algorithm is also important. People who dont the algorithm they just scroll down. -- shahebaz1985 —Preceding unsigned comment added by Shahebaz1985 (talkcontribs) 13:01, 16 November 2007 (UTC)

Clipping as a term for collision detection[edit]

I'm interested in knowing where this usage originated. tgies 01:38, 18 October 2007 (UTC)

Importance of clipping in video games[edit]

This section contains a paragraph of information that is completely enclosed in parentheses:

"(Normally there are 30 video frames drawn per second on an American or Japanese (NTSC) video game console, or 25 video frames per second on a European (PAL) console. Computer LCD screens generally display 60 frames per second, while CRT monitors may go to 100 or even more refreshes per second. )"

This paragraph really isn't tied into any of the rest of the section. It should probably be deleted, and if necessary, replaced with a link to a relevant Wikipedia article.

Since this entire article is tagged for cleanup, perhaps this section might not even be included, which is why I'm not going to delete it. Maybe the person cleaning up the article will find a way to put this passage to good use. -- OranL (talk) 17:20, 15 February 2008 (UTC)

I deleted this passage, because I know that it is useless: the is not required to generate pictures at this frequency. The fps can vary ande is independent of the output-frequency of the RAMDAC. The only requirement is, that the fps should be high enough for fluid gameplay. The minimum fps (not minimum average fpsw) reuired for this depends on the game, but it is normally between 15 fps (i.E. rts-games) and 25 fps (i.E. fast fps-games]]). For some games, you need an average fps of 60 or more to stay over 25 fps most of the time. Only if Vsync is enabled, the fps cannot be higher than the vertical refeshrate of the RAMDAC. --Qaywsxedc (talk) 17:33, 22 June 2008 (UTC)

needs pics[edit]

I believe illustrations of the concept would improve the article significantly. --TiagoTiago (talk) 22:35, 23 June 2010 (UTC)