Talk:Cloning

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Section 3.3.2: Tadpoles are animals[edit]

This sentence at the end of section 3.3.2 does not make sense: "Though Dolly was the first cloned animal, the first vertebrate to be cloned was a tadpole in 1952." Tadpoles (the larval stage of amphibians) are animals, therefore if tadpoles have been cloned before, Dolly is not the first cloned animal. Maybe it should say: "Though Dolly was the first cloned mammal, the first vertebrate to be cloned was a tadpole in 1952." Does anybody know if there has been other instances of mammal cloning before Dolly ? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Pijeth (talkcontribs) 09:24, 9 February 2010 (UTC)

My bad. I meant to say "mammal", not "animal". I've fixed it now. Gabbe (talk) 09:41, 9 February 2010 (UTC)

Dolly was not the first cloned mammal.[edit]

Despite the fact that the article states this. It even says about 6 sentences later that the first mammal cloned was a mouse! Can someone fix this? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.28.72.87 (talk) 20:56, 27 May 2010 (UTC)

Dolly was cloned from an adult cell, the mouse from an embryonic cell. Thats a big difference and should be explained in the article. AIRcorn (talk) 02:25, 15 December 2010 (UTC)

I agree that is stated very well that Dolly was first cloned mammal from an adult cell, but is there posibillity somebody to write about first cloning ever, because is hard to find evidence that don't say that Dolly is the first cloned mammal. Thanks — Preceding unsigned comment added by Kisstudent17 (talkcontribs) 07:35, 24 January 2011 (UTC)

Rule of Thumb?[edit]

There is no reference to any "rule of thumb" for restoration of extinct species. Just who determines the rules? --71.245.164.83 (talk) 00:29, 15 December 2010 (UTC)

Suppose the "rule" was such that no species should be genetically restored until former habitat is first restored - why would that prevent the restoration of any species destroyed by man, such as the Passenger Pigeon or the Great Auk? There is plenty of existing habitat - they were lost primarily by the lack of regulations. Regulations already protect hundreds (if not thousands) of species from extinction. --71.245.164.83 (talk) 00:29, 15 December 2010 (UTC)

Relevant article[edit]

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/30/business/global/30got.html story about cloned fighting bulls

Dhollm (talk) 07:26, 30 July 2010 (UTC)

This article does not state the history of cloning. It first originated from early farmers to reproduce fruits that were better than the others. :( —Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.125.48.223 (talk) 19:21, 24 December 2010 (UTC)

Cloning is distinct from artificial selection, if that's what you're referring to. Gabbe (talk) 02:41, 25 December 2010 (UTC)

Strange but True[edit]

The 2010 Iowa State Fair Grand Champion Steer was a clone of the 2008 Champion. Champion steer at Iowa State Fair continues reign I'm not sure it's something to put in the article, or if it is where to place it. --Aflafla1 (talk) 05:53, 10 October 2011 (UTC)

Binary Clones (science fiction)[edit]

In the science fiction section, it might be worth noting the concept of binary clones (DNA from two individuals are combined, to create an artificial offspring). It's less common in science fiction, than standard cloning (i.e. one donor), but common enough for it being worth mentioning. Binary clones include the metacrisis Doctor (a hybrid of the Doctor's Time Lord DNA and Donna Noble's human DNA), seen in Journey's End, the daughter of T'Pol and Charles Tucker III on Star Trek Enterprise. Along with comic book characters as Superboy, Nate Grey, X-23 and Ultimate Spider-Woman.

Weasel Words citation in final paragraph[edit]

The sentences following the citation make the citation itself nullified, if I understand things correctly. The citation refers to an ambiguous 'many' and what follows the citation defines that 'many'. Is the citation still required here? 72.228.51.242 (talk) 11:13, 9 March 2012 (UTC)

Extinct[edit]

Should the cloning of extinct animals have it's own article? Here is an idea for an article name. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 101.98.128.11 (talk) 02:44, 21 June 2012 (UTC)

Deleting bit that contradicts the source given[edit]

Hi guys - I'm about to make a change to this paragraph:

"Pyrenean Ibex (2009) was the first "extinct" animal (while the species is not extinct, nor even endangered, no living examples of the Pyrenean subspecies had been known since 2000) to be cloned back to life; the clone lived for seven minutes before dying of lung defects.[33]"

I'm going to delete the bit in brackets because it contradicts the source article provided. The source says, "The Pyrenean ibex, a form of wild mountain goat, was officially declared extinct in 2000... extensive hunting during the 19th century reduced their numbers to fewer than 100 individuals. They were eventually declared protected in 1973, but by 1981 just 30 remained in their last foothold in the Ordesa National Park..."

If anyone wants to restore the claim that the animal is "not extinct, nor even endangered", then he or she must provide a source at this point, because the source given says the opposite.Señor Service (talk) 00:20, 1 December 2012 (UTC)

Oh, scratch that - I think I misunderstood it. On reflection, I guess that "species" refers to the Ibex, which is still around - with only the Pyrenean *sub*species being extinct? Left as is.Señor Service (talk) 00:25, 1 December 2012 (UTC)
I see the change never came through, the bit in brackets is a bit confusing: being extinct, but not extinct or endangered. While its true the species is still alive, the particular subspecies isn't. And being that it hadn't been fully analyzed for taxonomy, it may be as far to qualify as its own species. Either way the bracketed text needs some help, or removed. 74.42.191.247 (talk) 06:02, 28 January 2014 (UTC)
I addressed this with an edit today, putting the sub-species clarification in a note. i hope the edit resolves this issue. Jytdog (talk) 11:56, 28 January 2014 (UTC)

Birds and reptiles[edit]

Is there any reason why birds and reptiles haven't been cloned? I'm surprised that chickens haven't been cloned. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 101.98.128.11 (talk) 03:58, 15 March 2013 (UTC)

I'm a bit late, but you could try asking at the reference desk. Acalycine(talk/contribs) 10:40, 10 August 2014 (UTC)

Hans Driesch[edit]

Hans Driesch is considered to be the first person to clone an animal. Were is he in this article?--Wester (talk) 22:30, 15 August 2013 (UTC)

Section 3.4 Lifespan[edit]

Can this section be expanded at all? It is a very important point to note, but without follow-up or more information it does not seem necessary to put in its own sub-section. Maybe it should be added to a larger section if no new information or studies can be added.

Jfriend2 (talk) 18:26, 28 January 2014 (UTC)

Main Picture[edit]

Does anyone have a different picture that clearly represents cloning? The main picture now is hard to interpret. On first glance it looks like debris floating in water.

Jfriend2 (talk) 22:54, 4 February 2014 (UTC)

Human Cloning Section[edit]

The main article Human Cloning has recently been updated and the information in this section does not represent the main article anymore. I will be making some changes to this section to better represent the updated information in the main article.Jfriend2 (talk) 16:36, 15 April 2014 (UTC)

I'm helping too! Estephe9 (talk) 16:55, 15 April 2014 (UTC)

Dolly Parton[edit]

I am not sure about this revision: it seems like a non-sequitur. The link in the references just asks me to login, so I can't see the source material that was quoted for this. Can someone please elaborate? I am only asking because I can't tell if this is meant to convey some information (and I'm just not getting it), or if it is vandalism. Allquixotic (talk) 23:16, 30 July 2014 (UTC)

somebody created the reference link from inside a university somewhere so the link doesn't work. That was a mistake. I replaced it with a better reference. Jytdog (talk) 00:11, 31 July 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 8 August 2014[edit]

Please can you change the phrase: "which allow only cells in which the vector has been transfected" to become: "which allow only cells in which the vector has been transformed". The process of transformation is that associated with the insertion of DNA into bacteria, transfection is typically a reference to the transient introduction of DNA into cells such as in mammalian cell research. The heritable introduction of DNA into bacteria is typically achieved via the process of bacterial transformation. Rcawooddna (talk) 10:56, 8 August 2014 (UTC)

Red information icon with gradient background.svg Not done for now: Can you find a reliable source that makes these definitions clear? From what I can tell [transfection] is not necessarily transient. Cannolis (talk) 11:02, 16 August 2014 (UTC)