Talk:Cold seep

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abiotic or photosynthetic?[edit]

If the cold-seep biomes are independent of photosynthesis, that would imply the methane and other hydrocarbons are abiotic, does it not? Or do we mean not currently dependent on photosynthesis? I know there's been debate over how much of our hydrocarbon deposits may be abiotic, but I thought the agreement was relatively little—or am I just out of date? kwami (talk) 09:00, 17 June 2008 (UTC)

Longest lived invertebrate?[edit]

Ming is the nickname given to a specimen of an ocean quahog clam, Arctica islandica, family Veneridae, and is the oldest living animal ever discovered. Judging by the annual growth rings on the clam's shell, Ming was believed to be in the region of 405-410 years old when the clam was caught off the coast of Iceland in October 2007. The claim was made by researchers at Bangor University. The researchers are uncertain how long the clam, which died during the assessment process, might have lived had it been left on the ocean floor. The clam was named after the Ming Dynasty due to its age. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 93.189.2.146 (talk) 21:52, 27 August 2009 (UTC)

"hydrocarbonate"[edit]

The section on "Comparison with other communities" refers to "reduced chemical compounds (H2S and hydrocarbonates)". In this sentence, "hydrocarbonates" should be "hydrocarbons", which are reduced chemical compounds found at some cold seeps, whereas "hydrocarbonate" is a little-used expression for bicarbonate, which is a fully oxidized compound. 128.192.40.124 (talk) 19:28, 4 April 2012 (UTC)