Talk:Computer programming in the punched card era

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Computing (Rated Start-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Computing, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of computers, computing, and information technology on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Computer science (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Computer science, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Computer science related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

I think the following needs to be updated. I don't think the use of "geeks" is appropriate.

Dedicated geeks of the era might stay up all night to get a few quick turn-arounds in the early morning hours -- otherwise unavailable, using this very expensive equipment -- mainframe computer usage was measured in seconds per job, and every job was charged to an account.(167.1.150.241 (talk) 20:49, 8 January 2009 (UTC))

The punched card era encompassed the paper tape era[edit]

Seems to me that some paper tape details should be added to this article and it should be renamed "the punched paper era"--partially because I don't think "programming in the paper tape era" deserves its own article. Paper tape and punched cards overlapped significantly, were concurrent choices, and each had pluses and minuses. TECO (from which Emacs was derived) was invented precisely to edit paper tapes (by editing forward from beginning to end), and the line by line vs character stream ideas about text files are quite prevalent in the history of von Neumann machines, with vestiges still extant today, unix vs. mainframes, and with vi being the outgrowth of the "by line" view. 96.224.32.111 (talk) 18:05, 14 August 2012 (UTC)