Talk:Contrabass bugle

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Marching band (Rated Start-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Marching band, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Marching bands on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Drum Corps  
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Drum Corps, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Drum and bugle corps (modern) on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the importance scale.
 

Wording of first paragraph[edit]

I dislike the wording on the article in the first paragraph of the history section, it makes it sound like EEEb tubas more common than they were, and, to my knowledge, no more than five of these instruments were made. I do not, however, know how to reword the paragraph at the moment, as it is late, but if it's not edited tomorrow I'll change it. 68.93.81.112 (talk) 03:22, 1 September 2008 (UTC)

"Bazooka Tuba"?[edit]

Is anyone else familiar with the slang term "Bazooka Tuba" for this instrument or other shoulder-carried tuba? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 65.191.125.142 (talk) 07:44, 3 October 2010 (UTC)

First contra prior to over-the-shoulder models[edit]

Jack Bullock is known for his innovations in bugle instruction and arranging, mainly with the Geneva Appleknockers in upstate New York. In the 1950s, he was one of the first to create jazz-styled horn arrangements. He also made performing a year-round activity, scheduling sit-down stage concerts during the winter months. For many winters, the Appleknockers attracted more members for the winter schedule of performances than for summer parades and field shows. He was instrumental in working with Whaley Royce and Co. manufacturers of Toronto, Canada in introducing the first contra-bass bugle, almost 10 years before the over-the-shoulder model became common. The Whaley Royce design produced the proper sound, but the horn was the conventional bugle shape. The weight of the instrument made it too heavy and cumbersome to manage while marching, and it was used only briefly by the Appleknockers.


http://www.worlddrumcorpshof.org/biographies.htm

1981 induction biography —Preceding unsigned comment added by 67.247.169.215 (talk) 04:19, 29 March 2011 (UTC)