Talk:Control key

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Chuck Norris[edit]

Is it true that he is the owner of the only PC keyboard in the world WITHOUT a CTRL key - because he is always in control ! Sorry, couldn't resist :-) — Preceding unsigned comment added by Malau (talkcontribs) 16:03, 7 November 2011 (UTC)


I've a old Microsoft DOS 2.10 manual from September 1983 which uses Ctrl-C style notation and so have labeled that style "Old Microsoft". I can't recall seeing it written this way before then. The manual also writes CTRL-C.

  • I'm guessing someone got the capitalization mixed up on the old/new MS styles, I just corrected the new one to Ctrl+C (from CTRL+C). I agree with you, that's what I recall the old style as, so I'm going to change that. -FunnyMan 15:25, 24 May 2006 (UTC)

Unless I misinterpret it, the ASCII page shows that the CTRL button zeroes only the first three bits (not four, as this article says. Zeroing all four bits would leave you with only four variable bits, which would let you access only sixteen, not thirty-two, new values.) I'm changing it

Other Combinations[edit]

For you guys to check out...

  • Ctrl+Up Arrow: Previous Para
  • Ctrl+Down Arrow: Next Para
  • Ctrl+Esc: Start Menu
  • Ctrl+F4: Closes "Sub-Window" or Tab (in tabbed browsing)
  • Feel free to add more combos... if these above ones work quite universally, do add them to the article; i haven't done so.

On a sidenote, this list of shortcuts is missing from most other articles in the Keyboard Keyz Seriez. Some kind soul should start one up for all of them! Alveolate 16:35, 8 May 2007 (UTC)

All of the CTRL characters on a teletype had legends, such as SOH, ETX, XON, etc.

The Ctrl+G (0x07, BELL) character still works in a Windows command prompt window, it will beep your PC's internal speaker, type >echo ^G 76.91.222.113 (talk) 00:43, 19 August 2010 (UTC)

"In modern computers the interpretation of keypresses is generally left to the software, modern keyboards distinguish each physical key from every other and report all keypresses and releases to the controlling software. This additional flexibility is not often taken advantage of and it usually does not matter, for example, whether the control key is pressed in conjunction with an upper or a lower case character."

What about ctrl+tab vs ctrl+shift+tab? --71.142.100.26 (talk) 07:53, 17 November 2007 (UTC)

Yes. Or Ctrl-F2 vs. Ctrl-Shift-F2 in VB. But you don't often see a combination of Ctrl-Shift-Letter. But yes, Ctrl-Shift combinations do exist. Shinobu (talk) 09:36, 15 July 2008 (UTC)
Not to mention that they probably crop up quite often in games that use Ctrl, Shift and Alt as input keys. 193.156.79.200 (talk) 14:41, 5 January 2010 (UTC)

Why is Replace Ctrl-H?[edit]

I just wondered why replace is Ctrl-H... It can't be Ctrl-R, because that one's taken, I understand that. But the H is not even in ‘replace’. Was it just an arbitrary choice or is there a historical reason behind this? Shinobu (talk) 09:36, 15 July 2008 (UTC)

I've always hypothesized that it was because F is "find" and G is "go to" (for example, in the Microsoft Word "Find and Replace" dialog), so they made H "replace" because the F, G, H keys are in a row (on a QWERTY board at least). — ¾-10 23:39, 16 November 2009 (UTC)
It's the same reason Ctrl-V is "Paste". Because Ctrl-C is for "Copy" and Ctrl-X is for "Cut" (no 'x' in "cut", but at least conceptually it makes sense as a mnemonic), and those keys are next to each other on QWERTY, while the more obvious 'P' is on the opposite corner. Lurlock (talk) 21:02, 28 May 2010 (UTC)

References[edit]

I'm a french user, so excuse my english ;)
Hello, both links referenced are dead, could you please replace them?
Thanks a lot. Reptilien.19831209BE1 (talk) 16:57, 11 January 2013 (UTC)

The caret[edit]

My keyboard doesn't have a caret on the key. Neither did any of my old keyboards. Is it true that most keyboards have a caret on the control key? Pikachu Bros. (talk) 15:31, 14 February 2014 (UTC)