Talk:Conway–Maxwell–Poisson distribution

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Statistics (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon

This article is within the scope of the WikiProject Statistics, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of statistics on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page or join the discussion.

Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the importance scale.
 
WikiProject Mathematics (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject Mathematics
This article is within the scope of WikiProject Mathematics, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Mathematics on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Mathematics rating:
Start Class
Low Importance
 Field: Probability and statistics


Can someone explicate recisive formula for the moments? In particular the case r = 0 looks confusing as to what it meansd and how it is meant to be used. Perhaps it would help to define the moments as a function of the parameters and then give an explicit expression in terms of this function. Melcombe (talk) 08:51, 18 September 2008 (UTC)

Eponyms??[edit]

This article says:

Typically, the negative binomial distribution is used to model data with over-dispersion, however the Conway–Maxwell–Poisson (CMP) distribution provides an improved, yet relatively unknown, alternative.

You see the conspicuous omission: obviously it should say:

Typically, the negative binomial distribution is used to model data with over-dispersion, however the Conway–Maxwell–Poisson (CMP) distribution, named after ?????? Conway, ?????? Maxwell, and ?????? Poisson, provides an improved, yet relatively unknown, alternative.

It's obvious which "Poisson" is involved, and an obvious guess for the second eponym is James Clerk Maxwell, but which Conway is involved is less clear. Can someone fill in the blanks in the article? Michael Hardy (talk) 03:38, 20 October 2009 (UTC)


The Distribution is named after Richard W. Conway and William L. Maxwell, who wrote the book "Theory of Scheduling" (ISBN 0-486-42817-6) --217.91.126.201 (talk) 00:38, 23 December 2009 (UTC)