Talk:Copper deficiency

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WikiProject class rating[edit]

This article was automatically assessed because at least one WikiProject had rated the article as start, and the rating on other projects was brought up to start class. BetacommandBot 16:25, 10 November 2007 (UTC)

ICD9 classification[edit]

The ICD9 link points to Wilson's disease, which is disorder of copper metabolism. This is not the EXACTLY the same as copper deficiency, is it? Copper deficiency caused by inadequate copper or too much zinc in the diet is not the same thing as wilson's disease. What is the correct ICD9 coding for copper deficiency? --SV Resolution(Talk) 16:49, 22 May 2008 (UTC)


Is this serious?[edit]

I don't think this should be in a medical article.

Metallic zinc is the core of all United States currency coins, including copper coated pennies. People who ingest massive amount of coins will have elevated zinc levels, leading to zinc toxicity induced copper deficiency and thus displaying neurological symptoms. This is the case for a 57 year old woman who was diagnosed with schizophrenia.[1] This woman consumed over 600 coins, and started to show neurological symptoms such as unsteady gait and mild ataxia.[1] — Preceding unsigned comment added by Ursinism (talkcontribs) 22:06, 22 April 2011 (UTC)

This is quite serious, and does belong in this medical article. A medical pica (disorder) condition (craving to eat non-food items) is quite common, especially among those who are iron-deficient. Copper-coated pennies are about 97% zinc.

SYNDROME OF COPPER DEFICIENCY IN INFANTS[edit]

Copper deficiency and non-accidental injury SHAW http://adc.bmj.com/content/63/4/448.full.pdf

SYNDROME OF COPPER DEFICIENCY IN INFANTS

  • Psychomotor retardation.
  • Hypotonia.
  • Hypopigmentation.
  • Prominent scalp veins in palpable periosteal depressions.
  • Radiological changes of osteoporosis,
  • blurring and cupping of the metaphyses, sickle shaped metaphyseal spur formation, sub-periosteal new bone formation and fractures.
  • Pallor.
  • Sideroblastic anaemia, resistant to iron \

448 group.bmj.com on January 12, 2014 - Published by adc.bmj.com
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