Talk:Copyright law of France

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Links[edit]

Link to SACD is to an audio format, not a copyright society. Alberrosidus 05:27, 2 March 2006 (UTC)

Edit of Vneiomazza 23:29, 18 March 2006 (UTC)[edit]

I have made a few changes to the Moral rights section. I have changed the translation of the droit de retrait et de repentir, firstly because I couldn't find the word "renouncal" in my dictionary, but also because I don't think that renunciation is quite the issue here: the effect of the right is still withdrawal (retrait) of the work, even if the reason for its exercise is a renunciation (repentir) of the views contained therein on the part of the author. I have also changed imprescriptible to inviolable, because I don't think the former word is understandable enough to Anglophone non-lawyers.

Official texts[edit]

I can't find any reference to the copyright status (or PD, as most EU countries) of government works. Help? Sherurcij (speaker for the dead) 06:53, 9 January 2009 (UTC)

It has been a bit unclear in the past but, in general, French government works are copyrighted and the copyright belongs to the individual author. From para. 3 of Art. L111-1 CPI (my quick translation and notes):
"The enjoyment of this same right [copyright] is not derogated when the author the work is an agent of the State, of a territorial collectivity [i.e. local government], of a public establishment with administrative character, of an independent administrative authority with legal personality or of the Bank of France."
By para. 1 of Art. L131-3-1 CPI, the French government controls the right to exploit the works (roughly the "copyright" in the U.S. sense) of its employees created in the course of their duties insofar as this is strictly necessary for its "public service mission". There are also some limitations on the moral rights of government authors.
The only exception appears to be laws, which are general held to be in the public domain although I can't find any specific legislative provision. The copyright notice for Légifrance [1] implies that laws, regulations and court judgments are NOT covered by copyright. Physchim62 (talk) 09:34, 9 January 2009 (UTC)
A pity, but thanks for the help. I wasted an hour last night looking for that. Sherurcij (speaker for the dead) 00:48, 10 January 2009 (UTC)

Move discussion in progress[edit]

There is a move discussion in progress on Talk:United States copyright law which affects this page. Please participate on that page and not in this talk page section. Thank you. —RM bot 12:45, 16 June 2011 (UTC)