Talk:Cosmochemistry

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hi[edit]

i am studying about quantum mechnics in the unversity. and i've got some problems..... i don't know how to show that it is possible to use spectroscopy to confirm the presence of both 4He+ and 3He+ in a star by calculating the wavenumbers of the n=3 → n=2 and of the n=2 → n=1 transition for each isotope....

and one more thing is how to account that H is the most abundant element in all stars, but only very weak absorption and emission lines due to neutral H are found in the spectra of stars with effective temperatures higher than 25000K.

That seems to have been in 2006. Hopefully the answer was found afterwards. Postings should be followed by ~~~~ in order to give a signature and a date. Rursus dixit. (mbork3!) 20:25, 26 April 2010 (UTC)