Talk:Cosmology in medieval Islam

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Perfect Solution[edit]

Islamic cosmology Islamic cosmology is the perfect solution, especially solving the issues created by current day Atheist, confused definition of science related to species

Whats this suppose to mean ? extremely biased statement —Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.157.7.209 (talk) 06:49, 10 February 2009 (UTC)

NPOV[edit]

Claiming that the Qu'ran talks about the big bang theory is, to me, nothing more than an overstatement. Some verse may have some faint, vague resemblance with the concept of an expanding universe as in the following example:

Chapter 15 verse 19 "And the earth We have spread out (like a carpet); set thereon mountains firm and immovable; and produced therein all kinds of things in due balance."

Nowhere in the qu'ran is it mention of a initially dense and hot universe that as cooled down while expanding which are the fundamental premises of the big bang theory.

It would be nice also to have some references that support the copernical view of earth that is claimed about the qu'ran.

This article sounds more like a pseudo scientific add promoting some superstitious beliefs rather than an objective encyclopedic article. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.83.145.213 (talk) 06:06, 7 May 2008 (UTC)

I have deleted everything that claimed that the Quran mentioned the Bigbang theory and the expansion of the universe. Extraordinary claims needs extraordinary evidences...
I have also removed the passage that said that " Islam did not have a Ptolemaic belief of the Earth" because this is innacurate. Although some have proposed a heliocentric model of the solar system, the Ptolemaic point of view was accepted by the large marority of Islamic scholars throughout the Islamic Golden Age until the Maragha Revolution around the 13th or 14th century. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.201.83.79 (talk) 23:25, 12 May 2008 (UTC)

Deletetion of poorly sourced claims[edit]

I have deleted the following : Also it is mentioned in surah al anbiya 21:33 about the sun revolving in its own axis along with the other planets which scientists have discovered very recently about 10-15 years back.

Chapter 21 verse 33 of the quran states the following: 21:33 It is He Who created the Night and the Day, and the sun and the moon: all (the celestial bodies) swim along, each in its rounded course. translated from arabic by Yusuf Ali

Where do you understand in this verse that the sun rotates around its own axis? Moreover it is Galileo who showed that the sun revolved around itself by observing the motion of sunspots... That was 400 years ago not 10 or 15 years back.

I have also removed this line: The Qur'an also mentions about expanding universe in a surah like "And the heaven We built with Our own powers (aydin) and indeed We go on expanding it (musi'un)" as these verses revealed 1400 years ago.

As I said before, extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. From what chapter, what verse and what translator did this verse come from? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.201.83.79 (talk) 17:39, 24 May 2008 (UTC)

I have also deleted the entire section about Salafi views. It was based on incorrect sources, and something that is wholistically not supported by the muslim community. Such views have not been supported since the inception of Islam, and have never been included as part of religious teachings, or islamic cosmology. Whoever posted that section is clearly diluded and driven by spiteful anti-islamic views, or extreme sectarian influences. (a muslim)

The sources and Links were real books of the likes of Shaikh Ibn Baz !!

In Islamic countries nowadays - especially among Salafi scholars - there are many movements that returned to beliefs like "Earth is the center of the universe", "The Sun revolves around the Earth daily" and "The distance between Earth and Heaven is 500 years of traveling (about 7 million km)". Famous scholars like Ibn Baz and Uthaymeen favored this interpretations of religious texts and proved them as Islamic Facts. Fatwa Ibn Uthaymeen from his official site Fatwa Ibn Baz in his book (Textual and rational proofs of the rotation of the sun and the motionlessness of the earth and the possibility of ascension to other planets) --Mando Salama (talk) 00:21, 14 December 2011 (UTC)

Cosmology in Islam[edit]

There needs to be a complete re-write on this area. I am happy to add to this if there are no objections ? Khari Sharif (talk) 19:46, 1 March 2009 (UTC)

Experimental Astrophysics ?[edit]

The section "Experimental astrophysics and celestial mechanics" is totally misnamed. Since astrophysics is the study of physical processes in stars and other celestial bodies, the only thing that passes for experimental astrophysics is that done by a colleague who was trained as an astrophysicist and then went on to design thermonuclear warheads. I don't think that's what the editor had in mind. --SteveMcCluskey (talk) 22:59, 8 April 2010 (UTC)

Self luminous?[edit]

I removed:

Al-Betrugi was also the first to discover that the planets are self-luminous.[1]

This is wrong, so he can't have discovered it. I don't know what it is a garbling of William M. Connolley (talk) 19:07, 24 March 2011 (UTC)
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