Talk:Cross-sectional study

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I am an economist, and I searched for cross section in order to be sure about the usage of the term in English (my native language is Spanish). However, I was surprised when I read this article, since it does not say anything about what field does it refer to. It seems like it refers to studies in medicine, am I right? I think it should be better specified, since the term cross section is also widely used in statistics and econometrics, with a meaning that is very similar to what this article refers to. It should maybe be merged with the article "cross-sectional data", since they refer pretty much to the same kind of study, but on a different context. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 190.156.105.135 (talk) 19:47, 18 June 2013 (UTC)

I am in a class where the teacher is asking me to describe the cross-sectional views that can occur when cutting a rectangular prism and a cylinder. What should I do? This question is really confusing can you please help me?

A cross-sectional study has very little to do with an algebraic geometry question -- cross-sectional studies are done in the social sciences, not in mathematics. Try asking on the talk page at Cylinder (geometry) or at Cuboid...

Also, I encourage you to keep in mind, Wikipedia is not a homework advice service. (See WP:WIN.) How can you be sure that the answer you get here at Wikipedia will be a correct one, if you don't also think through the questions posed by your teacher on your own?

You may find it useful to read Wikipedia:Who writes Wikipedia and Wikipedia:Schools' FAQ. Mamawrites 16:07, 7 January 2006 (UTC)

It is better to keep the distinction going

I have studied a cross section of s stem as also that of a flower in my botony classes. These days I am engaged in consumer research which involves cross sectional sampling. Cross section means different things in these two different contexts. In the case of a stem we are just cutting a stem across and studing the profile of the stem from a different angle. This is a cross sectional study of the stem. The same could be done even in the case of social sciences, if we were to use census method. That would mean every single person or item is included in the study. Of course the census could be limited to a particular geographical area. On the contrary, when we do cross sectional analysis in social sciences, we take out a small sample from out of a large population in a way that the constituents of the sample represent the characteristics of the population being studied. I believe that there is therefore, adequate justification to keep these two concepts separate at least until academicians provide alternative terminologies that do not appear to mean the same.

Definition[edit]

I am just a little unclear as to why the Wikipedia definition is only relating to epidemiology. Cross-sectionals are done in mostly the social sciences and are not specific to any one field. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 65.27.177.29 (talk) 00:53, 16 April 2007 (UTC).

This page should be included in the "Economics portal", why is it in Medicin?

Wikipedia is funny.

Guilherme d (talk) 22:15, 25 April 2010 (UTC)

Comparison to case-control studies[edit]

The article currently says: "Unlike case-control studies, they can be used to describe absolute risks and not only relative risks." This implies to me that case-control studies can be used to describe relative risk, but I believe this is false (they can find odds ratios, and cohort studies can find relative risks). Either I'm factually wrong or I'm the only one confused by the wording, or I believe this sentence needs to be re-worded. I'm just not sure enough to make the edit myself. 69.116.211.248 (talk) 00:45, 2 September 2010 (UTC)

You are absolutely correct, and I juts made the correction (while also adding two references to the use of RR with cross sectional studies). Thanks for writing. Tal Galili (talk) 19:21, 15 February 2012 (UTC)