Talk:Crowdsourcing

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Correctness of statements and proper references[edit]

Regarding paragraph: "It is usually expected from a crowdsourced project to be unbiased by incorporating a large population of participants with a diverse background. However, most of the crowdsourcing works are done by people who are paid or directly benefit from the outcome (e.g. most of open source projects working on Linux). In many other cases, the end product is the outcome of a single person's endeavour, who creates the majority of the product, while the crowd only participates in minor details.[76]"

Looking up reference 76, I only find a news article with merely the personal opinion of the writer -- no further references therein whatsoever to support the claims made in the section listed above. As a critical (scientific) reader, I must therefore deem the paragraph non-factual, without evidence; they do not belong in this form in an encyclopedia. For instance, the statement that Linux is based on projects should be detailed; above all: how much a part is financially independent, and how much is not? If financial dependence is marginal, the above paragraph appears not worth mentioning; if is, then it is.

It is clear that the problem outline is a valid concern. But without further details and examples based on actual research, the statements definitely appear made up. In short, the statements are not based on factual research. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 134.76.222.49 (talk) 22:08, 23 December 2013 (UTC)

Reorganizing the "Modern methods" and "Predecessors" sections[edit]

User stuen007 changed "Predecessors" to "Historical Examples." This brings the section more in line with the definition provided earlier in the article, which allows for examples of crowdsourcing that occur offline. Brndn.js (talk) 15:41, 17 September 2014 (UTC)

In addition, we moved "Crowdsourcing Typology" to the top-level "Modern methods" section, as this content describes a method of looking at how crowdsourcing is broken down into categories. In addition, we made "Types of Crowdsourcing" a top-level heading, and changed its name to "Examples," to better describe its content. This way, the "Historical Examples" and "Examples of Crowdsourcing" sections are parallel. Brndn.js (talk) 15:41, 17 September 2014 (UTC)

"Wisdom of the Crowd" heading moved to See Also section. Solar Nebula (talk) 16:01, 17 September 2014 (UTC)

More examples of non-internet predecessors[edit]

We've added two more useful examples of non-internet uses of crowdsourcing. One is the use of crowdsourcing to gather information about the Leonid meteor showers. The other is the gathering of information about the number of birds in certain places on christmas day which provides useful data to ornithologists. - StartlingCanary2 A.stass21 Studently Danie949 15:53 UTC 17 September 2014 — Preceding undated comment added 15:53, 17 September 2014 (UTC)

Additional information about authors + additional citation[edit]

Added information about Daren C. Brabham, Henk van Ess, Enrique Estellés-Arolas, and Fernando González Ladrón-de-Guevara. Also fixed some [citation needed] tags with references. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Cadunne (talkcontribs) 15:58, 17 September 2014 (UTC)

Separate Page that might need to be incorporated into the main page[edit]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crowdsourcing_as_Human-Machine_Translation This topic seems an odd choice to have it's own page, especially due to its title. I do not know if it would be better off under the Crowdsourcing page or the Machine translation page. I will add this same post to the Machine Translation page. StartlingCanary2 (talk) 16:02, 17 September 2014 (UTC)

Updating Ethics section to include Citizen Science ethics[edit]

Within the citizen science community there are some agreed upon ethics, such as crediting crowdworkers and only using them when they are necessary, that aren't in the article. Me and my classmates have started on a section, pasted below. Someone else can feel free to continue.

[Citizen Science]] projects, strongly tied to academia, have to operate under a more strict ethical code than private institutions utilizing crowdsourcing. For example, they have to make sure that participants are properly credited in papers for which they provided the data and analysis. They also need to make sure participants are doing work that is both necessary and unable to be done by a machine as to not waste their time (CITE: http://www.citizensciencealliance.org/proposals.html).


Darch Paper- https://ay14.moodle.umn.edu/pluginfile.php/741572/mod_resource/content/1/darch2014.pdf — Preceding unsigned comment added by Cadunne (talkcontribs) 17:00, 10 December 2014 (UTC)