Talk:Ctesiphon

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Sack[edit]

The general that sacked ctesiphon in 164 AD was Avidius Cassius not Avitus....two different romans living centuries apart

Julian the Apostate also attacked Ctesiphon in 363 but was repelled. He did win the initial battle, though, so he'd probably deserve a mention (Julian died in a battle during the retreat from Ctesiphon)

removed a shout-out tag. --xiaou

Salman Pak same as Madain?[edit]

In some sources Salman Pak is said to be a different name for the city of Madain/Ctesiphon, while in other sources it says that Salman Pak is a village neighboring Madain. Does anyone have a definite answer? Pats243 01:10, 25 February 2006 (UTC)

The answer is a definite yes. The tomb of Salman the Persian--the first Persian to become a Muslim and chosen as one of the 'Companions' of the Prophet Muhammad is only a short walk away from the great arch.

Salman arrived in Ctesiphon with the invading Muslim army. It was probably due to his influence and earlier correspondence with the authorities in the city that Ctesiphon opened its gates to the Muslims and surrendered without much of a fight. Salman was thus appointed by the Caliph Umar as the first Muslim mayor of the city, where he lived and served until his death. Today, his tomb is a sacred place and is visited by the Shia and the Sunni Muslims alike. He is also considered to be the patron saint of the barbers (whence the Persian colloquial term for a barber shop: "salmani.") Every year local people bring their newborn boys for their first haircut to the tomb of Salman. It is a festive occasion and everybody enjoy themselves with food, drinks and music.

M. Izady

The present day city of Salman Pak is on the east bank of the Tigris River (the map on the Page puts ancient Ctesiphon on the West side of the river). The City of Madain is a little bit further east of the river. Both Cities are currently hot-beds of sectarian killing between Sunni and Shia. The irony is, thousands of years later, there is still a heavy Persian/Iranian influence in this area. I would like to make a trip to the ruins of Ctesiphon before I leave Iraq but no one else is keen to make a road trip.....IEDs.

-From Baghdad —Preceding unsigned comment added by 80.255.36.116 (talk) 19:37, 14 October 2007 (UTC)

No mention of Alexander of Macedon's invasion[edit]

--213.141.159.52 15:07, 7 March 2006 (UTC)

Ctesiphon was just a village at the time of Alexander. It is only after his death that one of his general, Seulucus builds a town in there and names it after himself, Seulucia on the Tigris.

Map[edit]

The map seems to show Ctesiphon on the left bank of the Euphrates, which is wrong. It should be on the left bank of the Tigris. 86.149.8.107 15:50, 9 June 2007 (UTC)

Seperate article for Al-Mada'in?[edit]

I expanded / created the article on Al-Mada'in, because I think it's worth distinguishing them - Al-Mada'in is the broader metropolis / urban area, whereas Ctesiphon was one of the cities in it, so Al-Madain would be Ctesiphon and it's suburbs, or Seleucia and it's suburbs, etc. (depending of the period we're talking about).

What would you think about moving (or copying?) some of the material from the Ctesiphon article to Al-Mada'in? flammifertalk 17:37, 14 July 2007 (UTC)

New article for Taq-i Kisra[edit]

... because I think it deserves an article of it's own. (plus hey, you can see it on Google earth!); I moved a couple paragraphs from the "Palaces of Ctesiphon" section here to over there. They didn't really fit here, and I guess they were recently moved from a seperate article, right? Anyway, they were slightly redundant with the rest of the article (at least on the history and locations bit), so i also reintegrated a bit into the main article. flammifertalk 08:05, 15 July 2007 (UTC)

Palace photo date[edit]

Is there any way of verifiying the date of 1864 assigned to the first photograph of the palace ruins? I ask because I happened to be looking at Hugh Kennedy's The Early Arab Conquests, which contains the same photo but dates it to 1912. Given that parts of the palace apparently collapsed in the 1880s, this is of some significance.

Zburh (talk) 21:54, 22 June 2008 (UTC)

Cleanup lead[edit]

The lead section needs some cleanup, perhaps an infobox, and removal of images. Viriditas (talk) 11:31, 29 April 2009 (UTC)

Destruction of Books[edit]

How could the books be thrown to the Euphrates, when Ctesiphon is at the side of the Tigris? I've corrected it. If someone has a reason to revert it, please clarify said reason here.

Can someone please provide any credible citation for this claim. i Have never heard of "Library of Ctesiphon" being burned/destroyed by the Arabs. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Farhad.tajik (talkcontribs) 04:37, 28 October 2009 (UTC)

Copyright problem removed[edit]

Prior content in this article duplicated one or more previously published sources. The material was copied from: http://www.iranicaonline.org/articles/ctesiphon. Copied or closely paraphrased material has been rewritten or removed and must not be restored, unless it is duly released under a compatible license. (For more information, please see "using copyrighted works from others" if you are not the copyright holder of this material, or "donating copyrighted materials" if you are.) For legal reasons, we cannot accept copyrighted text or images borrowed from other web sites or published material; such additions will be deleted. Contributors may use copyrighted publications as a source of information, but not as a source of sentences or phrases. Accordingly, the material may be rewritten, but only if it does not infringe on the copyright of the original or plagiarize from that source. Please see our guideline on non-free text for how to properly implement limited quotations of copyrighted text. Wikipedia takes copyright violations very seriously, and persistent violators will be blocked from editing. While we appreciate contributions, we must require all contributors to understand and comply with these policies. Thank you. MER-C 11:48, 12 September 2013 (UTC)

See also Wikipedia:Contributor copyright investigations/HistoryofIran and Wikipedia:Non-US copyrights#Countries without copyright relations with the United States. MER-C 11:48, 12 September 2013 (UTC)

Pronunciation[edit]

I know that the Latin and Greek pronunciations of Ctesiphon are straightforward, but is there any consensus on its pronunciation in English? When I first heard the name in a Roman history course taught by a Latin professor, he said it as "stɛsəfan". Going by the Greek, though, it seems that "stisəfan" would also be likely. What about historians in the UK or elsewhere in the English-speaking world? Tsunomaru (talk) 23:08, 9 September 2008 (UTC)

Dunno about a consensus. I just removed this—/ˈtɛsɨfɒn/—from the lead sentence. Unlike Polybius, this is something where we should have a pronunciation guide but we need to have reliable sources for it, not just people's best guesses. We also need some explanation on what that κ was doing there in the first place if the original name was just T~ and Greek has a perfectly good Τ sitting around to start its words with. — LlywelynII 06:37, 26 August 2014 (UTC)