Talk:Cuisine of New England

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Food and drink (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Food and drink, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of food and drink related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
Checklist icon
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
 
WikiProject United States / Massachusetts / New Hampshire / Rhode Island / Vermont (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject United States, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of topics relating to the United States of America on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the ongoing discussions.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Massachusetts (marked as Mid-importance).
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject New Hampshire (marked as Mid-importance).
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Rhode Island (marked as Mid-importance).
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Vermont (marked as Mid-importance).
 
WikiProject Connecticut (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Connecticut, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Connecticut on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Maine (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Maine, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of the U.S. state of Maine on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Old Bay[edit]

Please try to fit in a mention of Old Bay Seasoning. On the west coast of the US, we've never heard of this stuff. I was surprised when the Northeast, and ordering french fries, to be asked, "you want regular or old bay"? ike9898 17:58, May 31, 2005 (UTC)


Old Bay Seasoning is really used in and around the Chesapeake Bay, especially for seasoning steamed crabs and vegetables, in fine restaurants and also at home. Old Bay is also known for its excellent crab, tuna and salmon cake mixes. Only in recent years have Old Bay seasonings become popular in New England.


Each region of the United States which has seafood as part of everyday life uses different seasonings. In New Orleans, for example, Zatairains, a food company native to New Orleans, is the primary commercially-available seafood seasoning, particularly its seafood boil seasonings and packaged seasonings (mixes) for crab, tuna and salmon cake mixes. A major flavoring ingredient, which New Orleanians call, "seasoning" and is found in the Zatairains seafood mixes, is clam juice.

  • While I love me some Old Bay, it is not typical of New England. As the Wikipedia article for the stuff makes clear, it is produced in Maryland and is most associated with that area, in particular it's use on boiled Chesapeake Bay Blue Crabs. So, although it's great stuff, it's not really appropriate to be listed in this article on New England. -- Friejose (talk) 21:33, 18 December 2008 (UTC)

I take issue with this Article[edit]

CT's cuisine is not a "New England" cusine, it is a CT thing influenced by near-by NYC. I wish you Boston propagandists would stop trying to make up something that does not exist. Is New Haven pizza really a New England thing or a NYC immigrant thing? Think before assuming. I keep telling you people that CT is NOT New England styled, we are NYC styled.--71.235.81.39 22:54, 31 May 2007 (UTC)

I think you meant to say "New Jersey is New York styled." Connecticut is a New England state. The 6 New England states are Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachussetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. see New England

As an Italian from the New Haven area who worked in a New Haven-style pizza restaurant for years and is well familiar with New York-style pizza, I think I can say pretty definitively that the top post is wrong. New Haven-style pizza is its own thing. It originated from immigrants who settled in Connecticut directly after leaving Italy. They didn't just jump the border into Connecticut from New York, and quite a few of the restaurant owners are very recent immigrants from Naples, Italy, who make their pizza based on how they made it back home.

Seriously. Connecticut is part of New England. No one cares how much you whine and want it to be part of New York. Thus, anything IN Connecticut contributes to New England Cuisine. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Cad2222 (talkcontribs) 04:38, 2 September 2009 (UTC)

As another New Haven resident (but not an Italian, although I do enjoy your pizza), the anonymous poster who "takes issue with this article" could not be more wrong. New Haven -- but a train's ride from New York City -- is a part of New England. There are a lot of New York transplants in Southern Connecticut, but most people identity with New England, even if they don't identify with Boston in particular.

New Yorkers themselves see Connecticut as part of New England -- which it is, in an integral, historical, cultural, factual sense. --71.235.239.166 (talk) 23:30, 28 October 2009 (UTC)

Moxie[edit]

Much as I love Farmington, Moxie has nothing to do with the town. It was originally created in Lowell, Mass (as a patent medicine) but it has gained much more fame from Lisbon Falls' Moxiefest. Due to that, I'm not sure which location to use. ~ RagingZangetsu 02:23, 26 February 2007 (UTC)

New England boiled dinner[edit]

If I trust the Corned Beef and Cabbage wiki article, then this dish is not of Irish heritage, and New England boiled dinner, to my personal and referenced knowledge, is much more than corned beef and cabbage. --Dumarest 12:01, 2 April 2007 (UTC)

There's also corned beef and dandelion greens...--75.68.233.187 16:26, 25 August 2007 (UTC)

There's also New England Boiled dinner made with ham instead of corned beef. Chefette1313 (talk) 03:04, 30 March 2008 (UTC)

Cabot Creamery[edit]

I added Cabot Creamery to Vermont staples, since I think it epitomizes the Vermont dairy industry as much or more as B&J. Especially since it's won so many cheese awards.--Sailor Titan 16:27, 25 August 2007 (UTC)


Bell's Seasoning[edit]

I miss in the article any mention on Bell's Seasoning "The William G. Bell Co. Since 1867". A blend of rosemary, oregano, sage, ginger, marjoram, thyme and pepper. jmcw (talk) 08:54, 31 January 2008 (UTC)

Subway[edit]

It's not called a sub in reference to subway. It's called a sub as a shortening for submarine. Subway took their name from the northeastern slang for a sandwich, not the other way around.

Edited to remove that. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 67.165.67.32 (talk) 20:33, 24 June 2008 (UTC)


No Scrod[edit]

I think the mention of scrod should be removed from the list of typical foods. It's served in many restaurants, yes, but most natives won't eat it--it's pretty much restaurant slang for "junk fish."

Hey, man, don't dis' the poor man's cod. --71.235.239.166 (talk) 23:32, 28 October 2009 (UTC)

Portsmouth Orange Cake[edit]

Is this legit? Is it still extant? Or was it famous only in colonial times? Any sources possible?

Frappe vs milkshake[edit]

Before McDonalds straightened everything out, if you ordered a "milkshake" in northern Vermont (I can't speak for the rest of NE), the waitress would take a glass of milk, and spoon in some ice cream. There were no blenders! If you wanted what the rest of the country called a "milkshake", you had best order a "frappe!" McDs, of course, has changed all of this and the distinction is lost today. Student7 (talk) 12:46, 29 April 2010 (UTC)

Smuttynose[edit]

The problem with entering "any food/beverage production place with an article" is that the article could be jammed with, essentially promo WP:PR links. Smuttynose is a local microbrewery, perhaps barely known in NY outside of New England.

But whatever. The links should be for chains/food producers that are known elsewhere than New England. Within the region is insufficient. Smuttynose shouldn't really be there IMO. Student7 (talk) 02:34, 25 May 2010 (UTC)

Maple syrup[edit]

An editor correctly asked for a citation about Vermont having the "best" maple syrup. I could not find one. I am "pretty sure" that there is a higher percentage of "grade a fancy light" syrup produced in Vt than anywhere, but not sure where that gets me for this article. A bit obscure, even if I could find ref. Please replace claim if you can find a citation. Student7 (talk) 20:44, 9 January 2011 (UTC)

I used to make maple syrup. The grades have nothing to do with the quality, per se. It's about color and consistency. Some people prefer darker syrups, which are by definition not "Grade A." It will be hard to find an unbiased "best" reference, considering that maple syrup is not something that many people feel passionate about. On the other hand, there is probably something to be said for per capita production being higher in Vermont than elsewhere, and for the fact that Vermont has special laws protecting the naming and branding of maple syrup. (The state's in the process of suing McDonald's for using the expression "natural maple syrup" on a product that is not, by Vermont standards, maple syrup.) --TimothyDexter (talk) 00:52, 10 January 2011 (UTC)

Hoagies[edit]

The editor may be correct about hoagies not being used in the area generally, but there several shops named (and selling) "Hoagies" in a rural area in northeastern Vermont, of all places. Not a trendy section of NE! Not sure where they got if from. Philadelphia? Wow. I don't know. Long ways from there. Student7 (talk) 23:09, 4 February 2011 (UTC)

Photos[edit]

This page could do with more photos? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 203.126.210.99 (talk) 06:55, 20 October 2011 (UTC)

Union Oyster House the oldest restaurant in the country?[edit]

The White Horse Tavern in Rhode Island has been operating as a pub/restaurant since the 1600s. How factual is the claim that the Union Oyster House is the oldest?

http://www.whitehorsenewport.com/about/history/