Talk:Cultural identity

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WikiProject Culture (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
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This mess of an article needs two things: 1) Severe copy editing in regards to paragraph and section breaks, and 2) a great reduction in technical jargon.

Agree. Someone with a severe case of culture theory (and no username and talk page) is doing the editing. I'm interested, because I went to grad school in anthropology back in the old days of "bounded cultures" and eventually rejected the whole field as an excresence of nationalism. There's some interesting ideas here, but too much cant is being propounded as THE TRUTH. No history, no other points of view.
I agree that this page is a single, limited, view of an extremely troubled and hardly "well-defined" concept. I am not sure how much work such a potentially bogus concept as "cultural identity deserves", however.
Would anonymous care to identify him or herself and we can work on this together? Zora 11:57, 25 Oct 2004 (UTC)

JIP | Talk 10:34, 25 October 2005 (UTC)

WP:OR removal[edit]

Unless any registered editor strenuously objects, I'm going to remove all the lengthy original research from this article, reducing it to a stub. Sandstein 04:32, 16 August 2006 (UTC)

Agree. Is it possible to note that the idea deserves some attention, but not to approach it in this weird way? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 165.235.240.35 (talkcontribs)
Yes, by marking it as a stub and by referring to this discussion in the edit summary. Sandstein 04:46, 19 August 2006 (UTC)

OK, I've done it. Sandstein 04:34, 23 August 2006 (UTC)

It at least needs a part about Quebec and their "distict society."

description[edit]

Hi all, the current text of the description reads:

There are modern questions of culture that are transferred into questions of identity. Various cultural studies and social theory investigate the question of cultural identity. In recent decades, a new form of identification and with pieces broken off from the individual as a coherent whole subject. Cultural identity remarks upon[clarification needed]: place, gender, race, history, nationality, language, sexual orientation, religious beliefs, ethnicity and aesthetics.

I propose to change it to:

There are modern questions of culture that are transferred into questions of identity. Various cultural studies and social theories investigate the question of cultural identity. In recent decades, a new form of identification has emerged. This new form of identification breaks down the understanding of the individual as a coherant whole subject to a collection of various cultural identifiers. These cultural indentifiers examine the condition of the subject from a variety of aspects including: place, gender, race, history, nationality, language, sexual orientation, religious beliefs, ethnicity and aesthetics.

However, i am far from an expert in cultural identity - does anyone want to comment on the new text before it goes up? Also, still relies on some statements that read terribly generally ex. "In recent decades, a new form of identification has emerged" Darigan (talk) 11:58, 9 November 2009 (UTC)

additions[edit]

Hey everyone and anyone. I'm Brooke a student at Azusa Pacific University and am hoping to help work on this page as a part of one of my Intercultural Communication classes. I was thinking it would be nice to add a section about the formation of cultural identity as well as its characteristics. I'm doing the research on it now. I have the book Intercultural Competence 7th Edition that I'm mostly working with. Thanks. Brooklynelyse (talk) 06:57, 20 February 2013 (UTC)

So the section I was interested in adding was the formation of cultural identity. Here is what I have to say about it. If anyone has any thoughts before I put it up let me know so it can be edited a bit.

formation of cultural identity[edit]

The Jean S. Phinney Three-Stage Model of Ethnic Identity Development is a widely accepted view of the formation of cultural identity. In this model cultural Identity is often developed through a three stage process: unexamined cultural identity, cultural identity search, and cultural identity achievement.'

Unexamined cultural identity: "a stage where one's cultural characteristics are taken for granted, and consequently there is little interest in exploring cultural issues." This for example is the stage one is in throughout their childhood when one doesn't distinguish between cultural characteristics of their household and others. Usually a person in this stage accepts the ideas they find on culture from their parents, the media, community, and others. [1]

An example of thought in this stage: "I don't have a culture I'm just an American." "My parents tell me about where they lived, but what do I care? I've never lived there."[2]


Cultural identity search: "is the process of exploration and questioning about one's culture in order to learn more about it and to understand the implications of membership in that culture." During this stage a person will begin to question why they hold their beliefs and compare it to the beliefs of other cultures. For some this stage me arise from a turning point in their life or from a growing awareness of other cultures. This stage is characterized by growing awareness in social and political forums and a desire to learn more about culture. This can be expressed by asking family members questions about heritage, visiting museums, reading of relevant cultural sources, enrolling in school courses, or attendance at cultural events. This stage might have an emotional component as well. [3]

An example of thought in this stage: "I want to know what we do and how our culture is different from others." "There are a lot of non-Japanese people around me, and it gets pretty confusing to try and decide who I am."[4]


Cultural identity achievement: "is characterized by a clear, confident acceptance of oneself and an internalization of one's cultural identity." In this stage people often allow the acceptance of their cultural identity play a role in their future choices such as how to raise children, how to deal with stereotypes and any discrimination, and approach negative perceptions. This usually leads to an increase in self-confidence and positive psychological adjustment[5]

An example of thought in this stage: "My culture is important, and I am proud of what I am." "It used to be confusing to me, but it's clear now. I'm happy being black."[6]

If you have any comments I'd love to hear back. I'm new to this and I think this is a really important aspect fo cultural identity. Brooklynelyse (talk) 04:59, 2 April 2013 (UTC)

New edit possibilities[edit]

Hello all. I am currently a Student at Drake University and working on creating the Global youth studies page for a credited course. Within this topic, my main interests involve focusing on the Cultural identity page. Since this page is fairly limited in extensity and research, I plan to revise and add to it in regards to quite a few topics.

The plan[edit]

Identity is something that every individual strives to find in this world. The construction of identity can be a long and detailed path, and differentiating between all. There are also many factors and concepts that go into creating one’s identity, and culture is one of them. Cultural identity is the structural factors and concepts of one’s culture that plays a modifying and formulating role in creating a concept of self and identification.

I would like to start off by revising the opening paragraph of this article to help make the description more clear and concise. Research regarding how cultural identity is seen and constructed on a global scale will potentially bring about this change. I would also like to possibly add youth and Adoption subtopics section to this page. This will help to deepen the understanding of cultural identity while pertaining to the material learned in my course. Lastly, I plan to revise any and all areas of this article that represent a limited global perspective of this topic. Since this article is rather brief in information, I will mainly focus on the education and school transitioning subtopics.


The goal is to find and analyze scientific research and journal articles as well as meta-analyses through available data-bases associated with these particular topics, in hopes of building a more wholesome article. Cultural identity, and identity construction in general, is a crucial topic from a youth perspective. Therefore, building a more global outlook on this topic will be beneficial to the wiki world.

Cales23 (talk) 14:57, 2 October 2014 (UTC)

  1. ^ Lustig, M. W. & Koester, J. (2012). Intercultural Competence: Intercultural Communication Across Cultures (7th ed.). Pearson. (131)
  2. ^ Lustig, M. W. & Koester, J. (2012). Intercultural Competence: Intercultural Communication Across Cultures (7th ed.). Pearson. (133)
  3. ^ Lustig, M. W. & Koester, J. (2012). Intercultural Competence: Intercultural Communication Across Cultures (7th ed.). Pearson. (132)
  4. ^ Lustig, M. W. & Koester, J. (2012). Intercultural Competence: Intercultural Communication Across Cultures (7th ed.). Pearson. (133)
  5. ^ Lustig, M. W. & Koester, J. (2012). Intercultural Competence: Intercultural Communication Across Cultures (7th ed.). Pearson. (132)
  6. ^ Lustig, M. W. & Koester, J. (2012). Intercultural Competence: Intercultural Communication Across Cultures (7th ed.). Pearson.(133).