Talk:Curling

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Vandalism to the page[edit]

Looks like there is some vandalism to the page but when I went to edit it, it didn't show up on the editing page, so I don't know how to delete it. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 75.150.82.17 (talk) 21:17, 11 January 2014 (UTC)

The vandalism was reverted, however it appears there's a glitch on Wikipedia that is preventing it from showing up (I still see it, but when I click to edit, it's not there). -- Earl Andrew - talk 22:00, 11 January 2014 (UTC)

In popular culture[edit]

Proposed addition:

In the 1969 film, On Her's Majesty's Secret Service, there is a scene at Piz Gloria that includes curling.

Crollo23 (talk) 06:27, 12 February 2014 (UTC)

It does not seem to be of great significance, but then neither is the instance in "Help!". To pass as popular culture it really needs contribute something of significance that speaks to how we live or think or reflects our history. Some of these instances in movies are just background. Ex nihil (talk) 08:25, 12 February 2014 (UTC)

When to concede in Olympic curling?[edit]

The article says "In the Winter Olympics, a team may concede after finishing any end during a round-robin game," but after the 7-point end in the UK vs US 2014 round-robin women's game commentator Pete Fenson said a team couldn't concede until after the 6th end during the round robin. Pete's a bronze medal winner; did he misspeak, or is the article wrong? Jere7my (talk) 06:42, 16 February 2014 (UTC)

It's possible the rule has changed, as this is an instance of a rule that changes frequently. -- Earl Andrew - talk 07:48, 16 February 2014 (UTC)
There is usually a minimum number of ends that needs to be played in these top-level competitions, which I think is usually six ends. I remember it was like this for one of the Briers where a team was outscored greatly and had to pay a fine for conceding earlier than the sixth end. Prayerfortheworld (talk) 07:58, 16 February 2014 (UTC)

Detroit Club[edit]

I don't understand the need to single out when the sport started in the US. they are not very relevant to the sport. I propose to remove the paragraph regarding the Detroit curling club. 161.43.253.77 (talk) 09:02, 17 February 2014 (UTC) mikitukka

Agree that this para should go but not because it is US-centric but because there is no reference cited and a bit of research following the links in it would indicate that the key points are not actually true. Ex nihil (talk) 12:59, 17 February 2014 (UTC)
  • I also agree that the US info is inappropriate as they are not a world curling power, and had considered changing it myself. One could make an argument to exchange US info for Canadian info, which would be very relevant - but in the interests of neutrality, perhaps replacement with info on the sport's arrival in North America would be best.Ian mckenzie (talk) 00:31, 22 February 2014 (UTC)
Removed; no apparent interest expressed in retaining it. If replaced please ensure that it is i). True ii). Significant iii). Matches related pages iv). Has adequate citations. Ex nihil (talk) 05:56, 22 February 2014 (UTC)

History[edit]

This section could be expanded to include the very important movement from outdoor to indoor ice, from natural to artificial ice, and the origins of pebbling. Ian mckenzie (talk) 23:59, 1 March 2014 (UTC)


How Many Rings?[edit]

The introduction says: a target area which is segmented into four concentric rings.

The "Equipment" section says: A target, the house, is marked at each end of the sheet. The house consists of three concentric rings.

Which is it?

Four - There is a 12-foot, 8-foot, 4-foot and one-foot ring which is commonly referred to as the button. --Coppercanuck (talk) 03:07, 23 July 2014 (UTC)