Talk:Cyberbullying

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"Women and Cyberbullying"[edit]

What is the point of this section, and why is there just a single random case noted? Is there something particular about women and this phenomena? SOmething special about this case? Seems arbitrary. 173.89.31.45 (talk) 23:37, 5 December 2009 (UTC)

The info about its classification & nomenclature....[edit]

--222.64.223.77 (talk) 03:48, 5 March 2010 (UTC)

--222.64.223.77 (talk) 03:42, 5 March 2010 (UTC)

It seems that this is a new area which needs to be deeply studied and which includes computer virus outbreak --222.64.223.77 (talk) 03:45, 5 March 2010 (UTC)

Deletion of video from lead[edit]

I have conflicted feelings about this edit [1], which removed a video from the lead section. On the one hand, I can partially agree with the edit, on the grounds that we might not want to be a conduit for such material, but on the other hand, I think that it may be appropriate to include it on this page. What do other editors think? --Tryptofish (talk) 16:20, 11 May 2010 (UTC)

Good call on deleting it. Leave it out. It added nothing encyclopedic to the article. Toddst1 (talk) 17:26, 11 May 2010 (UTC)

I think the video is okay on the article; because it represents an example of Cyber-Bullying. I say this as the uploader of the file; and I think it is illustrative. :-) --Diego Grez let's talk 16:58, 2 July 2010 (UTC)

I continue to speak here as someone who has mixed feelings, and can see both sides of the issue. Diego: can you explain in more detail why you feel that the video adds something of encyclopedic value? In other words, what does it add that is not available from the text, and what does it add that would outweigh concerns that it might be gratuitous? --Tryptofish (talk) 17:42, 2 July 2010 (UTC)
Sorry for the late response. The video adds something that pictures cannot, it's a clear video-example of cyber bulling. A friend of mine recorded this 5-minutes long video (although I cut it off after Commons' admins requested me to do so), that has been used to harass him. I reiterate, in addition that the article seems very boring without illustrations, the video will provide a clear example to the fellow readers and editors. --Diego Grez ¡aprende a llorar! 01:59, 7 July 2010 (UTC)
Boring? It's an encyclopedia, not entertainment. Toddst1 (talk) 04:40, 7 July 2010 (UTC)
Thanks for the answer, no problem with the time. I'm afraid that I'm going to come down on the side of not including the video. I appreciate the good faith intentions of presenting it, but absent some notable aspect of cyber-bullying that the video can illustrate but the text cannot, I do not think that readers need to see a specific instance of the phenomenon in order to gain an understanding of it. A case can be made that it is either pointy (as in saying: look how awful this is), or providing an audience to a bully who doesn't deserve it. Also, there is no reason to regard this particular incident as being notable. Sorry, but I would say leave it deleted. --Tryptofish (talk) 20:30, 7 July 2010 (UTC)

Jessi Slaughter[edit]

i want to point out that just because the article has been deleted, doesnt automatically mean that any mention of the incident must be deleted. I will not revert, as there are blp issues to consider, but events dont have to have their own article to be mentioned on WP.Mercurywoodrose (talk) 20:11, 25 July 2010 (UTC)

I saw the addition and then deletion of that edit, and I have an open mind about it. I agree with the principle of what you say: that the WP:N requirements for a sentence within a page are not the same as those for an entire page. On the other hand, the edit that was deleted here was unsourced. Is there a good secondary source to support the material being mentioned here briefly? --Tryptofish (talk) 20:16, 25 July 2010 (UTC)
Maybe this [2], from CBS News? --Tryptofish (talk) 20:21, 25 July 2010 (UTC)

I've read around the Wiki a little more, and gotten more familiar with the BLP concerns here. I now would be reluctant to put any material about this on the page, until some more time passes and we can see how independent sources view the topic, because I think the issues of potential harm to a minor are just too large. --Tryptofish (talk) 21:49, 25 July 2010 (UTC)

I think it should be included, but current consensus says no, so i will abide by it. however, if it gains more notability, it could be up for discussion again, at least as a single sentence. I have yet to read a really well thought out argument for summarily excluding it for blp reasons, but i am definitely open to one.Mercurywoodrose (talk) 22:18, 25 July 2010 (UTC)
That's very fair, I think. --Tryptofish (talk) 23:21, 25 July 2010 (UTC)

Cyber Harassment and Cyber Bullying are not the same thing[edit]

They are different names for the same thing. Whether the victim is a child or adult, the pain of being bullied feels the same. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Oilstone (talkcontribs) 17:07, 28 March 2011 (UTC)

This topic should be kept seperate. 'Cyber Bullying' refers to bullying via technology between MINORS, or initiated by MINORS. When adults become involved it is no longer referred to as 'Cyber Bullying', but rather as 'Cyber Harassment' or 'Cyber Stalking'. Although 'Cyber Bullying' and 'Cyber Harassment' are similar in nature, they both relate to different age groups and can involve different means of bullying or harassment. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 124.183.77.110 (talk) 10:38, 30 July 2010 (UTC)

A citation for that difference would be needed. — Arthur Rubin (talk) 14:08, 30 July 2010 (UTC)
To harass and to bully is similar, to cause emotional stress and psychological damage to the person on the other end. Also in need to be addressed is abuse of power by moderators and site owners against individuals, but it is hard to draw the line on what is typical moderation of a message board versus an urge to make the offending member a target and not only to ban, but ridicule a member endlessly and the act of "MISTing" or excessive trolling combined with harrassment and bullying, to make the banned member feel "very sorry" for his or her offenses. Site admins. and moderators should know the differences between doing their jobs and intentionally attacking a member, thus an act on an abuse of mod. powers. + 71.102.11.193 (talk) 02:16, 10 August 2010 (UTC)
That comment doesn't seem directed to improving the article, but I suppose I shouldn't revert. — Arthur Rubin (talk) 07:54, 10 August 2010 (UTC)

Trolling.[edit]

Isn't Trolling the more common well-known term for cyberbullying? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 67.160.123.254 (talk) 09:00, 21 August 2010 (UTC)

Not necessarily. While some trolling could be considered cyberbullying, quite often the target of trolling is not a person, but media such as a video game, movie, etc. For example, someone starts a thread with "OMGZ AVATAR SUCKED SO HARD", then proceeds to refuse to actually give their reasoning or have an intelligent discussion. Xaphnir (talk) 14:28, 14 September 2010 (UTC)


To clarify, trolling has been completely misunderstood by people. The media has completely confused 'trolling' with cyberbullying. Trolling is defined more as posting deliberately provocative things for the sake of amusement - perhaps even going so far as to create a fictional character. e.g. arguing that 4/5 of women should be forced to get an abortion with deliberate spelling mistakes and incoherent arguments. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 46.208.242.76 (talk) 13:47, 28 May 2012 (UTC)

Rename article[edit]

In my opinion, it must be cyberbullying, not ciber-bullying, like another words with cyber prefix. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Internetsinacoso (talkcontribs) 12:48, 11 October 2010 (UTC)

No I don't think so. It is spelled this way in English. In Spanish it can be called Ciberbullying, but not in English. --Diego Grez (talk) 16:24, 11 October 2010 (UTC)
In English, it must be spelled with a "y". It can be spelled either with or without a hyphen. Because the unhyphenated spelling is a redirect to this page, I do not think that matters. --Tryptofish (talk) 18:12, 11 October 2010 (UTC)

Edit request[edit]

{{edit semi-protected}} I request permission to make the following additions to this article:

Section 4: As of July 2010, 30 states have passed laws making electronic harassment illegal, but only 6 specifically define the term "cyberbullying." 29 states require schools to draft their own anti-cyberbullying rules. The Megan Meier Cyberbullying Prevention Act, which would impose prison sentences of up to 2 years against those who use "electronic means to support severe, repeated, and hostile behavior," is currently pending in Congress[1]

Section 7: February 12, 2010: Boston Mayor Thomas Menino meets with community leaders, city officials, and Boston Public Schools students to begin a cyberbullying awareness campaign. Possible measures discussed at the meeting included letters from the mayor to social networking sites and parents calling for action against cyberbullying, requiring city employees who work with youth to undergo additional training on how to deal with bullying, a hotline for victims to safely report bullying, and an anti-cyberbullying PSA.[2]

Section 13: Cyberbullying.info: site "aimed at students 10-14 years of age" to help them learn more about cyberbullying and what to do about it. CyberSmart! Cyberbullying Awareness Program: a series of teacher resources presented in conjunction with the National Association of School Psychologists Cmills88 (talk) 14:46, 27 October 2010 (UTC)

I have doubts about cyberbullying.us being a reliable source, even for interpretation of something verifiable. — Arthur Rubin (talk) 14:58, 27 October 2010 (UTC)
Having viewed the cyberbullying.us website more closely, I understand your doubts. Also, I cannot find any better single source of this information and I do not know how many sources I would have to use to properly verify this information. I would, therefore, like to limit my request to the edits I have proposed for sections 7 and 13. -- Cmills88 (talk) 21:38, 27 October 2010 (UTC)
  1. ^ "A Summary of State Bullying and Cyberbullying Laws."www.cyberbullying.us/Bullying_and_Cyberbullying_Laws.pdf
  2. ^ "Mayor Menino kicks off anti-bullying awareness campaign." Boston Public Schools, February 12, 2010

Edit request from 68.204.8.238, 6 June 2011[edit]

I want to point out that cyberharassment in the workplace is not simply cyber stalking as defined in the Wikipage. Cyberharassment against adults (and corporations) also include online defamation, tort interference, defacing, etc - see: Workman, M. (2010). A behaviorist perspective on corporate harassment online: Validation of a theoretical model of psychological motives. Computers & Security, 29, 831-839. I think the page should be modified to reflect this.

68.204.8.238 (talk) 10:24, 6 June 2011 (UTC)

The lead of the article sums it up fine:Cyber-bullying is "the use of information and communication technologies to support deliberate, repeated, and hostile behavior by an individual or group, that is intended to harm others"." What you are suggesting is unnecessary disambiguation. —James (TalkContribs)6:38pm 08:38, 10 June 2011 (UTC)

Edit reques, 19 September 2011[edit]

on facebook there are a huge amount of cyber bullying. quite alot of this is because it is easily spread. also it can be used for pedo's and other people to bully others, by typing to them and giving them grief over the facebook site

09waringm (talk) 17:34, 19 September 2011 (UTC)

I imagine that this may be true, but it's not clear what should be changed on the page. We would need a source to back up any claim that Facebook plays an important role in the phenomenon. --Tryptofish (talk) 21:19, 19 September 2011 (UTC)

one more language: hebrew[edit]

this is the link for the article: http://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D7%91%D7%A8%D7%99%D7%95%D7%A0%D7%95%D7%AA_%D7%A8%D7%A9%D7%AA I suggest you publish it on the side. Thanks. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Segalzeyalz (talkcontribs) 21:52, 12 November 2011 (UTC)

Edit request from , 14 November 2011[edit]

Gullable (talk) 11:59, 14 November 2011 (UTC)

X mark.svg Not done Zidanie5 (talk) 12:42, 14 November 2011 (UTC)


School Bullying Council (Cyberbullying) http://www.schoolbullyingcouncil.com/cyber-bullying/ — Preceding unsigned comment added by Bishwana (talkcontribs) 18:50, 24 July 2012

That page does not appear to do more than offer a publication for sale. Articles are not available for linking to pages like that, see WP:EL. Johnuniq (talk) 22:04, 24 July 2012 (UTC)

Copyvio claim: Cyber bullying definition[edit]

These edits have claimed a copyvio problem with http://www.cyberbullyinglaws.net/cyber_bullying_definition.html

It looks like Wikipedia was the source of at least some of the copy/pasted text; see diffs below.

Origin of "disclose victims' personal data":

Origin of "while the behavior is identified by the same definition in adults":

It seems likely that the copyvio was not by Wikipedia. Johnuniq (talk) 07:50, 5 December 2011 (UTC)

Revision of article before the copyvio tag was added: 05:55, 4 December 2011
My notes above show how two pieces of text were developed at Wikipedia. The above diffs show that it is extremely unlikely that the specified text was copied into Wikipedia.
I just had a closer look at the cyberbullyinglaws.net page. The third line contains '"embarrass another person."[' where the '[' is a link. That link is <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyber-bullying#cite_note-1">.
Searching the page for "</ref>" shows another location where a quick cleanup after copying from Wikipedia was incomplete. Johnuniq (talk) 03:57, 8 December 2011 (UTC)
More notes:
This article is reported at Wikipedia:Copyright problems/2011 December 5.
This version of the article is close to what would have been copied from Wikipedia: 14:05, 29 April 2010
Note that the cyberbullyinglaws.net article uses blue text (with no links) for items such as "threats" and "hate speech"—in the Wikipedia article those items are links to other articles. There are a lot of examples of this and it is inconceivable that cyberbullyinglaws.net made that blue text, then an editor copied it to Wikipedia and replaced each of the blue items with wikilinks. Obviously the text originated at Wikipedia, and was copied to the other website: the blue font was kept but the links to Wikipedia were removed. Johnuniq (talk) 04:05, 13 December 2011 (UTC)

Thanks for your investigation and careful analysis. I agree. The Wikipedia article history shows incremental edits by Wikipedia editors over time which appear to be now contained within the "source" website. Therefore, I have removed the copyvio template, restored the article to its latest revision, and added a backwards copyvio template to the top of this page. I am closing the report at Copyright Problems. CactusWriter (talk) 21:11, 13 December 2011 (UTC)

Edit request on 5 January 2012[edit]

Plzzz put more info bout c-bullyin i need it 4 my report k thx

99.228.101.118 (talk) 16:03, 5 January 2012 (UTC)

Not done: please be more specific about what needs to be changed. --Jnorton7558 (talk) 17:42, 5 January 2012 (UTC)

Edit request on 4 March 2012[edit]

I would like to edit this page by adding a paragraph summarizing a research article that relates to cyber-bullying and can be added under the section about research in order to keep it up-to-date. This can be added at the end of the section:

In addition to the current research,Sourander et al. (2010) conducted a population-based cross-sectional study that took place in Finland. The authors of this study took the self-reports of 2215 Finish adolescents between the ages of 13 to 16 years old about cyberbullying and cybervictimization during the past 6 months. It was found that, amongst the total sample, 4.8% were cybervictims only, 7.4% were cyberbullies only, and 5.4% were cyberbully-victims. Cybervictim-only status was associated with a variety of factors, including emotional and peer problems, sleeping difficulties, and feeling unsafe in school. Cyberbully-only status was associated with factors such as hyperactivity and low prosocial behavior, as well as conduct problems. Cyberbully-victim status was associated with all of the risk factors that were associated with both cybervictim-only status and cyberbully-only status. The authors of this study were able to conclude that cyberbullying as well as cybervictimization is associated not only with psychiatric issues, but psychosomatic issues. Many adolescents in the study reported headaches or difficulty sleeping. The authors believe that their results indicate a greater need for new ideas on how to prevent cyberbullying and what to do when it occurs. It is clearly a world-wide problem that needs to be taken seriously.

Source: Sourander, A., Klomek, A.B., Ikonen, M., Lindroos, J., Luntamo, T., Koskeiainen, M., … Helenius, H. (2010). Psychosocial risk factors associated with cyberbullying among adolescents: A population-based study. Archives of General Psychiatry, 67(7), 720-728.


Jseff (talk) 08:17, 4 March 2012 (UTC)

The article is freely available at http://archpsyc.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/67/7/720 . Regards, mabdul 13:41, 4 March 2012 (UTC)

Done Thanks, Celestra (talk) 17:48, 4 March 2012 (UTC)

Edit requests from Statesboro High School class project[edit]

Edit request on 23 April 2012[edit]


The National Crime Prevention Council reports that cyber-bullying is a problem that affects almost half of all American teens. So social networking is becoming a huge part in today’s world some social networking sites like Facebook are teaming up with the UK Child Exploration to have an app available to users to easily report cyber bullying. The app will be advertised on the home page of these sites.


Gray Downs05 (talk) 13:39, 23 April 2012 (UTC)

The most important issue I see with the proposed addition is the need for sourcing for the statements that it contains. We cannot just add this to the page without attributing it to sources (one for the first sentence, another for the second and third). Also, the second and third sentences sound a little promotional, so maybe they could be rewritten to sound less boosterish. Where on the page would you propose to put this material? --Tryptofish (talk) 23:31, 23 April 2012 (UTC)
Thank you for rewriting the proposal. It still must cite sourcing, and we still need to know where, on the page, it would go. I'd also suggest not starting the second sentence with "so", and spelling out "application". --Tryptofish (talk) 22:02, 30 April 2012 (UTC)
Marking as answered given the above. When you had made adjustments to your request, feel free to change the |answered= parameter in the template from yes to no, and someone else will come along and review it. elektrikSHOOS (talk) 00:04, 1 May 2012 (UTC)

Edit request on 27 April 2012[edit]

The "Washington Post" states in one of their articles a surprising fact they found, "The center's research has shown that adolescent girls are significantly more likely than boys to partake in and experience cyber-bullying. Girls also are more likely to report cyber-bullying to a parent or teacher. The center's research also suggests that the type of cyber-bullying tends to differ by gender; girls are more likely to spread rumors, while boys are more likely to post hurtful pictures or videos."[1] Tf01152 (talk) 01:11, 27 April 2012 (UTC)

Where on the page would you propose to put this? --Tryptofish (talk) 20:07, 27 April 2012 (UTC)
Marking as answered given the above. When you had made adjustments to your request, feel free to change the |answered= parameter in the template from yes to no, and someone else will come along and review it. elektrikSHOOS (talk) 00:04, 1 May 2012 (UTC)

I think that this would be best served somewhere in section 3 "comparison to traditional bullying", because when many people think of traditional bullying, they don't think of females being the ones doing the bullying. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Tf01152 (talkcontribs) 00:24, May 1, 2012‎

OK, in that case, please provide an opening sentence about gender for the beginning of the paragraph. (I figure I'll put this paragraph at the end of that section.) Please also identify the "center" in question, and provide a URL for the Washington Post source. Thanks. --Tryptofish (talk) 22:04, 1 May 2012 (UTC)
  1. ^ MacDonald, Gregg (Sep 2, 2010). "Cyber-Bullying Defies Typical Stereotype". Washington Post.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help);

Edit request on 27 April 2012[edit]

According to the Cyberbullying Research Summary, "there have been several high‐profile cases involving teenagers taking their own lives in part because of being harassed and mistreated over the Internet, a phenomenon we have termed cyberbullicide – suicide indirectly or directly influenced by experiences with online aggression." [1] VLSMITH12 (talk) 01:21, 27 April 2012 (UTC)

Where on the page would you propose to put this? --Tryptofish (talk) 20:08, 27 April 2012 (UTC)
Marking as answered given the above. When you had made adjustments to your request, feel free to change the |answered= parameter in the template from yes to no, and someone else will come along and review it. elektrikSHOOS (talk) 00:04, 1 May 2012 (UTC)

I believe this information would best fit in section 5-Harmful effects, under Intimidation, emotional damage, suicide. — Preceding unsigned comment added by VLSMITH12 (talkcontribs) 01:20, May 1, 2012‎

Yes check.svg Done Thanks! --Tryptofish (talk) 22:08, 1 May 2012 (UTC)
  1. ^ Hinduja, Sameer; Justin W. Patchin (2009). "Cyberbullying Research Summary". Archives of Suicide Research. Retrieved 04/25/2012.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)

Edit request on 27 April 2012[edit]

In a recent survey of 2,000 teens by the Cyberbullying Research Center "20% of respondents reported seriously thinking about attempting suicide (19.7% of females; 20.9% of males), while 19% reported attempting suicide (17.9% of females; 20.2% of males)." They also stated that "cyberbullying victims were almost twice as likely to have attempted suicide compared to youth who had not experienced cyberbullying." [1] ReidPennington (talk) 01:35, 27 April 2012 (UTC)

Where on the page would you propose to put this? --Tryptofish (talk) 20:08, 27 April 2012 (UTC)
Marking as answered given the above. When you had made adjustments to your request, feel free to change the |answered= parameter in the template from yes to no, and someone else will come along and review it. elektrikSHOOS (talk) 00:04, 1 May 2012 (UTC)
  1. ^ Patchin, Justin W.; Sameer Hinduja (2009). "Cyberbullying Research Summary". Archives of Suicide Research. Retrieved 04/22/2012.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)

Edit request on 30 April 2012[edit]

According to a 2006 poll from the national organization Fight Crime: Invest in Kids found that 1 in 3 teens and 1 in 6 preteens have been the victims of cyberbullying. As more and more youths have access to computers and cell phones, the incidence of cyberbullying is likely to rise.[1] — Preceding unsigned comment added by Hr00610 (talkcontribs) 22:08, April 30, 2012‎

Where on the page would you propose to put this? --Tryptofish (talk) 22:14, 30 April 2012 (UTC)
Marking as answered given the above. When you had made adjustments to your request, feel free to change the |answered= parameter in the template from yes to no, and someone else will come along and review it. elektrikSHOOS (talk) 00:04, 1 May 2012 (UTC)
  1. ^ "Cyber Bullying". Kids Health. Retrieved 27 April 2012. 

Requested move[edit]

The following discussion is an archived discussion of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

The result of the move request was: Move. Jafeluv (talk) 07:42, 8 May 2012 (UTC)


Cyber-bullyingCyberbullying – Note the lack of hyphen. The majority of sources in the article appear to use one word, without hyphen, when describing it, so it should be moved to that per WP:COMMONNAME. However, this page's history has shown that the hyphen has been controversial in the past, so I'm going to use this formal process for possible feedback first. elektrikSHOOS (talk) 01:10, 1 May 2012 (UTC)

  • Support move; the hyphenless version seems like a reasonable COMMONNAME to me. bobrayner (talk) 10:51, 1 May 2012 (UTC)
  • Support move. I've reviewed the page history, and there never really was a very good rationale for the hyphen. I also note consistency with Cyberstalking. However, please note that there are a bunch of categories that use the hyphen, that also might need to be renamed. --Tryptofish (talk) 21:52, 1 May 2012 (UTC)
  • Comment: It's cyberbullying in the online versions of Merriam-Webster's Collegiate and Oxford Dictionary of English. SSR (talk) 08:06, 6 May 2012 (UTC)
The above discussion is preserved as an archive of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

[edit]

I'm curious about the edit removing the logo image. Why is the logo unrelated to the subject of the page (per the edit summary). I'm really just asking, not complaining, because I do not understand. Thanks. --Tryptofish (talk) 18:54, 6 May 2012 (UTC)

Edit request on 14 December 2012[edit]

Please add below text. Is an add on under legislation tab. Following is prevention strategies to be used and other current legislation that has attempted to be passed and/or relates to cyber-bullying. Academic sources will be provided below.


Preventative Measures and Other Attempts at legislation[edit]

Researchers suggest that programs be put in place for prevention of cyber-bullying. These programs would be incorporated into school curriculum and would include online safety and instruction on how to use the internet properly.[1] This could teach the victim proper methods of potentially avoiding the cyber-bully, such as blocking messages or increasing the security on their computer.[1] Within this school prevention model suggested, it must be noted that even in a perfect world, not one crime can be stopped fully. That is why it is suggested that within this prevention method, effective coping strategies should be introduced and adopted. As with anytime of crime, we learn to cope with what has happened. The same goes for cyber-bullying. We can adopt coping strategies to combat future cyber-bullying events in the future. An example of a coping strategy would be a social support group comprised of various victims of cyber-bullying.[1] That could come together and share experiences, with a formal speaker leading the discussion. Something like a support group can be of a great importance, not only does it allow students to share their stories, but it allows that feeling of them being alone, to be removed. Teachers should be involved in all prevention educational models, as they are essentially the “police” of the classroom. Most cyber-bullying often goes unreported as the victim feels nothing can be done to help in their current situation. [1] However, if given the proper tools with preventative measures and more power in the classroom, teachers can be of assistance to the problem of cyber-bullying. If the parent, teacher and victim can work together, a possible solution or remedy can be found. [1] There have been many legislative attempts to facilitate the control of bullying and cyber-bullying alike. The problem is due to the fact that some loose legislation is already thought to be tied to bullying and cyber-bullying (terms such as libel and slander). These pre-existing legislations are attempted to be applied to cyber-bullying. The problem is they do not directly apply to it nor define it as its own criminal behaviour. [2] Anti-cyber-bullying advocates even expressed concern for the broad scope of applicability by some of the bills attempted to be passed. [3] In the United States, attempts to pass legislation against cyber-bullying were made. Few states attempted to pass broad sanctions in an effort to prohibit cyber-bullying. The problem is what is considered cyber-bullying to cyber-stalking and if charges are pressed, does it violate the bully’s freedom of speech.[3] As Walther mentions in his article, “Illinois is the only state to criminalize "electronic communication(s) sent for the purpose of harassing another person" when the activity takes place outside a public school setting.” Again this came under fire for infringement on freedom of speech.[3]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Von Marees, N., & Petermann, F. (2012). Cyberbullying: An increasing challenge for schools. School Psychology International, 33(5), 476.
  2. ^ Smyth, S. M. (2010). Cybercrime in canadian criminal law. (pp. 105-122). Toronto, ON: Carswell.
  3. ^ a b c Walther, B. (2012). Cyberbullying: Holding grownups liable for negligent entrustment. Houston Law Review, 49(2), 531-562.

References[edit]

  • Smyth, S. M. (2010). Cybercrime in canadian criminal law. (pp. 105-122). Toronto, ON: Carswell.
  • Von Marees, N., & Petermann, F. (2012). Cyberbullying: An increasing challenge for schools. School Psychology International, 33(5), 476.
  • Walther, B. (2012). Cyberbullying: Holding grownups liable for negligent entrustment. Houston Law Review, 49(2), 531-562.


Gillott66 (talk) 05:20, 14 December 2012 (UTC)

I think that this could potentially be added to the page, maybe with a little copyediting. However, before that happens, please revise the above text to conform with Wikipedia's style for referencing. Please read through WP:INCITE, and replace the text citations with the <ref></ref> format. --Tryptofish (talk) 01:43, 15 December 2012 (UTC)
Changed the referencing style according to request. Gillott66 (talk)
Thanks. I'm adding it to the page now. --Tryptofish (talk) 21:22, 16 December 2012 (UTC)
Yes check.svg Done. --Tryptofish (talk) 21:25, 16 December 2012 (UTC)

Edit Request 2013.2.5[edit]

Please delete category 'Computer crimes'. Cat Computer crimes should not have any cybercrimes (since Cat cybercrime is a subcat of that).76.103.213.6 (talk) 22:53, 5 February 2013 (UTC)

Wikipedia and Cyber-Bullying[edit]

Wikipedia and certain editors of Wikipedia should also be held accountable for their part in cyber-bullying. Many innocent people have written articles for Wikipedia which have been met with ridicule and deletion. Talk pages have left helpless victims stygmatized and unable to defend themselves as their edits are removed. An example of the defamation occurring through Wikipedia may be viewed on the talk page of List of Canadians Terry Ananny Canadian Artist. UNICEF artist Terry Ananny was made an example of what would occurr to artists who innocently try to create an article on their life work. The artist has had her name ruthlessly and systematically refered to as a vandal and other unpleasant adjectives which remain on Wikipedia, despite many many efforts to have them removed. It will be interesting to see under the new Canadian laws governing cyber-bullying if any action can be taken to minimize the damage that Wikipedia has cause to so many innocent contributors. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 74.12.28.158 (talk) 20:48, 25 April 2013 (UTC)

WP:Cyberbullying. WP:Griefing. And WP:DR, which isn't here. --Tryptofish (talk) 22:44, 25 April 2013 (UTC)


Spamming is not permitted on wikipedia. It is not cyberbullying to remove the damaging articles Ananny* creates.
  • possibly you.
75* 21:34, 13 May 2013 (UTC)
July 2014
Ananny (talk · contribs · count · api · block log) is still at it, see Today's SPI, block log and Wikipedia:Long-term abuse/Ananny.--220 of Borg 04:37, 6 July 2014 (UTC)

Reference for statement is needed[edit]

Sentence reads: "...often Internet stalking is treated with more seriousness than reports of physical stalking"

Added a 'Citation needed' tag to this sentence for now. Anyone got any reference to back up this statement? Glen newell (talk) 00:28, 7 August 2013 (UTC)

There is often a record of cyberbullying while real life harassment or stalking is often deniable, citation still needed, of course. User:Fred Bauder Talk 12:30, 8 August 2013 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 26 April 2014[edit]

Gaming "A new type of cyberbully known as a griefer is overtaking other forms of aggression on the Internet and in the world of online gaming, a health researcher warned. Unlike traditional Internet bullies who work through instant messages and cell phones, griefers lurk on online multi-player video games, harassing their victim by bullying, tormenting or thwarting other players in the game." Source: Thomson Reuters. http://www.reuters.com/article/2007/07/05/us-internet-bullying-idUSN0343424320070705 "A few years ago, Microsoft filed a patent for software that could actively filter real-time audio streams but until something like this comes to pass, how can we protect ourselves and our kids from becoming a victim of continued and often targeted harassment during online gaming? While all gaming sites struggle with this issue, some sites are able to handle the issue of bullying better than others. Popular news aggregate and game discussion forum, News for gamers, (or N4G) is an example of a gaming site that not only turns a blind eye to bullying among its threads but offers cyber bullies digital tools to further harass." Source: Kyle Kulyk Co-Founder and Lead Developer for Itzy Interactive Drdelasierra (talk) 23:46, 26 April 2014 (UTC)

Red information icon with gradient background.svg Not done: Your first request is a verbatim copy-paste from the source and therefore not allowed, and your second request reads like a verbatim copy-paste. I might be amenable to adding some of this content if you reword it in your own words. —KuyaBriBriTalk 14:24, 29 April 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 26 April 2014[edit]

Cyberbullying vs. Cyberstalking "In contrast with the term “cyberbullying”, “cyberstalking” is the term that has emerged to describe the use of technology to harass or stalk. Cyber-stalking is defined as the repeated use of the internet, e-mail, or related digital electronic communication devices to annoy, alarm or threaten a specific individual or group of individuals." Source: U.S. Department of Justice. Federal Bureau of Investigation. FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin. Drdelasierra (talk) 23:49, 26 April 2014 (UTC)

Red information icon with gradient background.svg Not done: This is a verbatim copy-paste from the source and it does not improve anything that is not already on the article. —KuyaBriBriTalk 16:32, 29 April 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 26 April 2014[edit]

Harmful Effects -"Feel overwhelmed" -"Feel vulnerable and powerless" -"Feel exposed and humiliated" -"Feel dissatisfied with who they are" -"Feel angry and vengeful" -"Feel disinterested in life" -"Feel alone and isolated" -"Feel disinterested in school" -"Feel anxious and depressed" -"Feel suicidal" "Additionally, when cyberbullying occurs, most people recommend shutting off the computer or turning off the cell phone. But, for teens this often means cutting off communication with their world. Their phones and their computers are one of the most important ways they communicate with others. If that option for communication is removed they can feel secluded and cut off from their world." Source: Sherri Gordon Bullying Topic Writer. Author of seven books for tweens and teens including Beyond Bruises: The Truth About Teens and Abuse and Using Technology: A How-To Guide. Former editor of Columbus Parent and Home Living magazines. Drdelasierra (talk) 23:52, 26 April 2014 (UTC)

Red information icon with gradient background.svg Not done: Verbatim copy-paste from source. Please rewrite in your own words. —KuyaBriBriTalk 16:29, 29 April 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 26 April 2014[edit]

Harmful Effects How Bullying Affects Kids “Kids that are bullied are likely to experience anxiety, depression, loneliness, unhappiness, and poor sleep,” explains Jennifer N. Caudle, DO, an AOA board-certified family physician in Philadelphia. Making the issue worse is the fact that such negative effects of bullying often go unnoticed, as many victims feel the need to conceal the fact that they are being bullied because they are embarrassed or afraid of further bullying. More often than not victims respond passively to bullying. They tend to act anxious and appear less confident. They may become quieter in class and, as a result, the bullying can become a hindrance on their academic success. Therefore, bullying is a problem that, if left unattended, can become a significant hurdle in a child’s development. Source: Jennifer N. Caudle, DO, an AOA board-certified family physician in Philadelphia from the American Osteopathic Association Drdelasierra (talk) 23:54, 26 April 2014 (UTC)

Red information icon with gradient background.svg Not done: Verbatim copy-paste from source. Please rewrite in your own words. —KuyaBriBriTalk 16:30, 29 April 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 26 April 2014[edit]

Cyberbullying vs. Traditional Bullying In a study of over 3,000 students, one researcher found that 38% of bully victims felt vengeful, 37% were angry, and 24% felt helpless. According to a fact sheet on juvenile bullying produced by the the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Juvenile Justice and delinquency Prevention, victims of schoolyard bullying fear going to school and experience loneliness, humiliation, and insecurity. Moreover, they tend to struggle with poor relationships and have difficulty making emotional and social adjustments.

Cyberbullying is even more harmful to young people than face-to-face bullying for a number of reasons: • Permanence: The insults, comments or images can be preserved by the person who was bullied or by others so that the victim may read or view them over and over again and the harm is re-inflicted with each reading or viewing. • Audience size: The size of the audience that is able to view or access the damaging material increases the victim’s humiliation. • Familiarity: Many young people are friends with or know their cyber bully either through school or other personal connections, increasing the potential for embarrassment and humiliation. • Social Networking: Social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace allow cyber bullies to engage in campaigns against a particular person which may involve many others. • Speed: The speed at which harmful messages can reach large audiences also plays a major part in making cyberbullying so damaging to the targets.

Source: 2009 AP-MTV Digital Abuse Study Johnson, J. M. (2009, March). The impact of cyberbullying: A new type of relational aggression. Paper based on a program presented at the American Counseling Association Annual Conference and Exposition, Charlotte, NC. Sameer Hinduja, Ph.D. and Justin W. Patchin, Ph.D. Cyberbullying Research Summary: Emotional and psychological consequences Youth Advisory Council, New South Wales, Report to the Minister for Youth on Cyberbullying

Drdelasierra (talk) 23:56, 26 April 2014 (UTC)

Red information icon with gradient background.svg Not done: Verbatim copy-paste from source. Request will be given due consideration if rewritten in your own words. —KuyaBriBriTalk 16:26, 29 April 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 26 April 2014[edit]

Cyberbullying vs. Traditional Bullying In a study of over 3,000 students, one researcher found that 38% of bully victims felt vengeful, 37% were angry, and 24% felt helpless. According to a fact sheet on juvenile bullying produced by the the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Juvenile Justice and delinquency Prevention, victims of schoolyard bullying fear going to school and experience loneliness, humiliation, and insecurity. Moreover, they tend to struggle with poor relationships and have difficulty making emotional and social adjustments.

Cyberbullying is even more harmful to young people than face-to-face bullying for a number of reasons: • Permanence: The insults, comments or images can be preserved by the person who was bullied or by others so that the victim may read or view them over and over again and the harm is re-inflicted with each reading or viewing. • Audience size: The size of the audience that is able to view or access the damaging material increases the victim’s humiliation. • Familiarity: Many young people are friends with or know their cyber bully either through school or other personal connections, increasing the potential for embarrassment and humiliation. • Social Networking: Social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace allow cyber bullies to engage in campaigns against a particular person which may involve many others. • Speed: The speed at which harmful messages can reach large audiences also plays a major part in making cyberbullying so damaging to the targets.

Source: 2009 AP-MTV Digital Abuse Study Johnson, J. M. (2009, March). The impact of cyberbullying: A new type of relational aggression. Paper based on a program presented at the American Counseling Association Annual Conference and Exposition, Charlotte, NC. Sameer Hinduja, Ph.D. and Justin W. Patchin, Ph.D. Cyberbullying Research Summary: Emotional and psychological consequences Youth Advisory Council, New South Wales, Report to the Minister for Youth on Cyberbullying Drdelasierra (talk) 23:56, 26 April 2014 (UTC)

Red information icon with gradient background.svg Not done: Duplicate request. —KuyaBriBriTalk 16:27, 29 April 2014 (UTC)

Digital Self-harm[edit]

I wanted to add information about digital self harm especially in light of the (IMO) under reported case about Hannah Smith in the UK who's suicide provoked a major outcry against Ask.fm but in fact it turned out 98% of the hateful messages were from herself.

Is this the correct page to the add the info to or should it get it's own one? The issue appears to sit half way between Self-harm and Cyberbulling but I'm not sure where's best. I think it might find it's place in attention seeking, I don't know really. Looking for the best page to start writing up the info I have. I'll be honest, there's probably enough press coverage to start Hannah Smith (dead teenager) of some kind, but I would find creating such an article personally in bad taste.

The Hannah Smith case is notable due to:

  • The volume of (UK, but also pan-european) press coverage focused on Cyberbullying
  • The press and government condemnation of the inaction of Ask.fm
  • The implementation of advertising blocking, some web blocking and calls to implement web blocking in response to the perceived inaction of Ask.fm.
  • The under reported element towards the end of the case when it was revealed most messages were sent to by the girl to herself, and the narrative of ubiquitous cyber bullies using a platform run by uncaring profiteers quietly fell apart.

I'm interested in adding information about this area due to my amateur psychology interest and significant contributions to article Web blocking in the United Kingdom where I'm trying to capture increasingly populist calls for web blocking by citing cases such as this.

Deku-shrub (talk) 23:39, 27 April 2014 (UTC)

Global cybermobbing of climate scientists[edit]

Please enter a new heading "8 Global Cyberbullying" with the following text:

Cyberbullying is not necessarily confined to a particular location or even to a region. Climate scientists and climate activists, for example, may be confronted with abusive emails from any location in the world. These emails may be responses to public statements that merely report the widely accepted findings of climate science and their implications for the future production of greenhouse gases by humans and for the survival of future generations. Such emails may be sent in response to suggestions posted on climate denial websites, which are effectively requests to engage in cyberbullying. Climate scientists and climate activists may also be confronted with libelous internet reports that aim to silence them or destroy their reputations. [1] [2] [3]

Knock3times (talk) 08:35, 18 August 2014 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done - I see you have already added this yourself - Arjayay (talk) 11:23, 18 August 2014 (UTC)

hey great article here are a few suggestion on how the government is trying to deal with cyber bullying from a legal perspective [3] [4] [5] --Uoit lyons (talk) 17:15, 15 October 2014 (UTC)

  1. ^ Douglas Fischer: Cyber Bullying Intensifies as Climate Data Questioned. Scientific American, March 1, 2010. [6]
  2. ^ Dominique Browning: When Grownups Bully Climate Scientists. Time, April 10, 2012.[7]
  3. ^ Ben Habib: Bullying Climate Change Scientists. Latrobe University News, 2010. [8]