Talk:Cytosine

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Untitled[edit]

Cytosine is defined here as "one of 5 main nucleobases..."

As one of four bases in DNA, the other 3 (Guanine, Adenine and Thymine) are each defined as "one of 4 main nitrogenous bases..." Though it is true that in RNA, Uracil replaces Thymine, it (uracil) is also defined as "one of the 4 main nitrogenous bases..."

I wonder if Cytosine should be changed to also be defined as "one of 4 main nitrogenous bases" to make it consistent with the other bases, though the article for "nitrogenous base" might need to be modified to further clarify the 4 main bases in DNA (guanine, adenine, thymine and cytosine) and the additional role uracil plays in RNA.

If this change were to happen, though, "uracil" would be odd base out and the article for that would need to be modified as (stated above) it also states it is one of the 4 main bases.

The other option is to re-define each of the others to "one of 5 main nitrogenous bases" because there technically are 5, but when speaking of DNA, uracil is excluded.

Happety 14:46, 15 Dec 2003 (UTC)

It should be 5 nitrogenous bases. And who on earth put cytosine (as opposed to cytidine) triphosphate? People shouldn't modify the page if they don't know what they're doing. Kr5t 02:59, 21 May 2006 (UTC)


So scientist used cytosine to store information. Cytosine can be used to store information. DNA stores information, Cytosine is in DNA. Is it possible that DNA has been using quantum states of cytosine to store information in addition to the genetic code information that is stored as sequences of base pairs?

People shouldn't modify the page if they don't know what they're doing.

What about BEBOLD? --Zerothis (talk) 05:33, 29 August 2008 (UTC)

IUPAC Name[edit]

The IUPAC name currently listed appears to be incorrect in that the indicated hydrogen 1H does not precede the ketone locant. Also, and it's a minor issue, but whilst the diones uracil and thymine are pyrimidinediones, cytosine is a pyrimidinone and as such the e is dropped. I am therefore changing the name to 4-aminopyrimidin-2(1H)-one. Nomenclature gurus, your thoughts are valued. Eutactic (talk) 05:06, 15 January 2009 (UTC)

Renaming cytosine[edit]

I'm not sure who decides these things, but it'd be really useful to rename cytosine as kytosine. You could pronounce it the same, but this way the bases would be A,T,K,G not A,T,C,G. C and G look really similar and I keep mixing them up. 193.60.95.72 (talk) 16:20, 19 October 2010 (UTC)