Talk:D-type asteroid

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Solar System (Rated Stub-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Solar System, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of the Solar System on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Stub-Class article Stub  This article has been rated as Stub-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
For more information, see the Solar System importance assessment guideline.
WikiProject Astronomy / Astronomical objects  (Rated Stub-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon D-type asteroid is within the scope of WikiProject Astronomy, which collaborates on articles related to Astronomy on Wikipedia.
Stub-Class article Stub  This article has been rated as Stub-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Astronomical objects, which collaborates on articles related to astronomical objects.
 

Comment[edit]

From the page for P-type asteroids:

"P-type asteroids have low albedo and a featureless reddish electromagnetic spectrum. It has been suggested that they have a composition of organic rich silicates, carbon and anhydrous silicates, possibly with water ice in their interior. P-type asteroids are found in the outer asteroid belt and beyond."

This is the same language, word for word as the description of D-type asteroids. It appears that someone has made a mistake here.

Also, Bill Arnett's "Asteroids" page lists three types of asteroids but does not include either the D or P type. It also mentions that there's more than one classification system. This article needs to address these questions.

Kevin Langdon 03:41, 4 June 2007 (UTC)

This site from Washington State University mentions D-type along with P-type. D-type is generally farther from the Sun and more reddish. Harald Khan (talk) 16:00, 20 November 2007 (UTC)