Talk:DEET

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Alternatives section does not belong in this article[edit]

The article is about DEET. Alternatives should be discussed briefly if at all and fuller discussions in their respective articles.

It would be better integrated into the insect repellents article.122.163.253.2 (talk) 08:54, 10 November 2010 (UTC)

Yes, I agree. Unless it's commercially available, it should not be listed. Research use is merely speculative. I'll take a look. --Rifleman 82 (talk) 15:51, 10 November 2010 (UTC)

Science News resource ... regarding Olfaction and insects[edit]

Science gets the deets on DEET; Insect repellent appears to repel mosquitoes by confusing them by Rachel Ehrenberg October 22nd, 2011; Vol.180 #9 (p. 10) 97.87.29.188 (talk) 22:52, 1 November 2011 (UTC)

Add Brazilian fruit fly Boa Esperanҫa? 99.181.138.228 (talk) 03:23, 2 November 2011 (UTC)
Add Insect repellent wikilink? 99.109.125.146 (talk) 01:02, 4 November 2011 (UTC)

Effects on materials[edit]

DEET can dissolve leather? really? H870rce (talk) 16:52, 1 June 2012 (UTC)

Seems dubious to me. Since it is not supported by any reference, I have removed it. -- Ed (Edgar181) 17:00, 1 June 2012 (UTC)

Leather is indeed on the fine-print list of materials which my OFF aerosol can warns "DO NOT APPLY ON OR NEAR." Maybe not dissolve but anecdotally ruins the finish of leather upholstery. No personal experience with leather, though leaking DEET has utterly destroyed several other items of mine, and internet search shows I have plenty of company. I came here to see whether this characteristic of DEET was mentioned, and was marginally satisfied to find the understated "Effects on materials" section. A more vivid image is conveyed in the very first sentence of the referenced Nature article. Classic. -- Rairden (talk) 03:32, 28 July 2014 (UTC)

Deet not part of the 4x100 cocktail[edit]

This article: http://www.bangkokpost.com/lite/topstories/310348/cocktail-lethal-for-sisters

Points out that: "The cocktail known locally as 4x100 contains cough syrup, cola, ground-up kratom leaves, which are a mild narcotic, and ice."

And that it is thought than "an overdose of DEET was accidentally mixed into the young women's drinks."

I've changed the main article to this effect; this is for the record. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 181.112.4.193 (talk) 00:41, 31 July 2013 (UTC)

Better explanation of DEET's abbreviation?[edit]

I've heard "DEET" for years and only just noticed that it's not an abbreviation for the chemical name. Where is the second "E" from? It can't be "di-ethyl-ethyl-m-toluamide", which is clearly incorrect. And if you formulate the name as "ethyl-ethyl-m-toluamide", there's no "D".

I don't otherwise see any other source for the second E, in most any of the potential synonyms (N,N-Diethyl-m-toluamide, N,N-Diethyl-3-methylbenzamide).

I see on ChemID that a synonym is (was?) DET, which makes sense... maybe DEET is just a bastardization of this?

If we can determine where it came from, we should explain this briefly in the History.

RedKnight7 (talk) 20:55, 18 September 2013 (UTC)