Talk:DJ Qbert

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NPOV[edit]

Richard Quitevis (born October 7, 1969), in San Francisco, California. Known by his stage name DJ Qbert or Grandmixer Qbert, is a Filipino-American Turntablist and composer. He is often referred to as the Jimi Hendrix of the turntables, known to make them sing in complex and subtle ways. He invented the first musical annotation system for scratching, battling and composing on vinyl.


This was apparently taken from his own site, and is completely biased anyway. I would correct it, but I know absolutely nothing about this man (besides, English is not my first language). Could someone do something about it? 88.169.49.46 (talk) 17:16, 22 July 2010 (UTC)


How is wave twisters NOT a full scratch album?[edit]

I hear scratching on every track!

A. At the time it was released, Wave Twisters was generally considered a "full scratch album" as scratching does play a heavy role in every track. However, with the release of D-Style's "Phantasmagoria" the meaning of "full scratch" became a bit more specified. "Wave Twisters" makes use of produced (unscratched) beats in many of the tracks with scratching serving as the "lead vocal", whereas the entirety of "Phantasmagoria" is scratched. - Renn —Preceding unsigned comment added by 64.121.32.211 (talkcontribs)

I think it's misleading to refer to it as being composed mainly by samplers, much of the sound is composed by 4 DJs, a la the old scratchpiklz. It could be pointed out, but precautions should be taken to keep it from sounding like a DJ Shadow or Automator album. Also, this is nitpicky but I don't think it's necessary to say samplers AND beat machines, they probably just used the samplers to emulate beat machines. --Patrik —Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.166.97.195 (talkcontribs)

Capitalization[edit]

I think Q-Bert should be spelled with a capital B. This seems to be the way he prefers it. Badagnani 03:32, 23 December 2005 (UTC)

  • I notice that IMDB calls him "DJ Q-Bert", although going to his own site refers to him as "DJ Qbert". Has his spelling changed over time? Also, Amazon.com has things like DJ Qbert's Wave Twisters by DJ Q-Bert, so obviously even they're a little confused. (side-note: I added a redirect from "DJ Q-Bert" to "DJ Q-bert".. I noticed a refering page had a broken link, due to capitlization differences)) --JamesLikesBeer 18:18, 10 February 2006 (UTC)
I vote for DJ Qbert. Darth Katana X 06:24, 2 March 2006 (UTC)

While I doubt that it matters to him much either way, and he may indeed change it haphazardly, The Album "wave twisters" refers to him as "DJ QBert" while he normally tags his name "Qbert". Additionally I've never seen him use the hyphenated Q-bert. - Renn

I’ve actually given this thought and done some research (no idea why, though… MP3 tagging, maybe?) IIRC, I settled on a lowercase B, perhaps because that’s how the video game writes it. It’s often written all-caps, such as on flyers, album covers, and graff, but I think it’s more commonly written Qbert than QBert, as in this picture—though, as Renn points out, never Q-bert. —Wiki Wikardo 07:25, 6 July 2008 (UTC)
(UPDATE: Proof (?) of his personal preference for the lowercase B)
(Another update: His MySpace, too.)