Talk:Dagon (film)

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Article name[edit]

Shouldn't this article be called Dagon (film)? Is there another movie called Dagon? Nareek 11:50, 24 July 2006 (UTC)

Moved it. - LeonWhite 22:59, 13 August 2006 (UTC)

References[edit]

These seems like weak links. It seems more likely to me that the similarity of Resident Evil 4's plotline to Dagon's is simply coincidence. It's similarly unlikely for the RE remake, especally since it came out only a few months after the movie. Unless someone can provide evidence that these games were actually referencing Dagon (the movie) specifically, I'd like to remove this section shortly.


Dagon[edit]

This piece of information in the article seems suspect:

The god Dagon was simply mentioned, while in the movie it actually appears, even though it resembles the Lovecraftian god Cthulhu more than the fish-like humanoid depicted in the short story "Dagon".

If you actually read Lovecraft's short story you will find that 'the vast Polyphemus like', aquatic Dagon DOES appear and that it is NOT a 'fish-like humanoid'.


As far as I remember, Dagon doesn't appear in "The Shadow Over Innsmouth", which is the original source of the movie as it is also specified at the beginning of the article.


I don't get this " paul's mother escaped from the town years ago and is Uxia's half brothers" Paul's mother is someone's brother? WTF. I'm guessing this needs some fixin or the story is really really freaky. 75.177.47.137 (talk) 02:03, 14 November 2009 (UTC)

Yes, it doesn't make sense. Metamagician3000 (talk) 09:09, 25 November 2009 (UTC)

Counter-cultural?[edit]

I actually liked this movie. I am not a fan of H.P. Lovecraft and I usually don't care for the macabre but I liked the movie especially because I liked the surprise ending. At the risk of offending the readers (or for that matter the western world :-) ), the "hero" Paul is a nerdy kind of guy whose girl-friend is a "hot" trendy-trashy flashy superficial common (modern) hoe - likely a gold-digger. The viewer cannot believe in the relationship because it cannot believe what this woman could really love Paul. However, the mermaid-woman Uxía, although seems weird and nerdy like Paul, is actually nice and her love for him, though incestuous, is actually genuine. The ending is surprising because it's kind of ending that goes against the grain where the "hero" would struggle to return to conventionality. Here, he becomes the "monster" and joins his beloved, also a "monster", and is eternally happy. It's the ending of Splash but counter-cultural. Here the "bad guys" win but it's a sound ending:-)12.169.97.130 (talk) 00:30, 23 February 2011 (UTC)

haha, I liked this movie more than I thought I would too. The thing is having reliable sources - it'd be great if Leonard Maltin or someone similar had noted this...Casliber (talk · contribs) 02:12, 23 February 2011 (UTC)
Thanks! Trouble is few critics have such balls. Lovecraft was proud of his anglo-saxon heritage and anti-modern. The English are special and peculiar in that, although they have contributed much to mass/media culture (in the English language) with e.g. Rock music, fashion, MTV, tacky tabloids like the Sun, etc... the irony is that the English, especially those of the older generations, are best able to resist it. I would like to call this aspect the "Lovecraft reaction". The English are capable of rejecting mass culture in favor of a "better" albeit incestuous and "old-school" aesthetic. I cannot say that this reaction is all-together right because it is clearly reactionary but then again you have to admit: much of mass media is in questionable taste. While it is true that much of mass media is a function of the masses, I agree with Voltaire: "when the people attempt to reason, all is lost!" :-) Call me an incorrigeable elitist :-) 208.65.181.179 (talk) 23:56, 23 February 2011 (UTC)