Talk:Daniel Yergin

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Peak Oil[edit]

Excerpt ...

Record of Inaccurate Statements-- While Yergin has been cited in the popular press on energy issues, his predictions and claims have been shown to be wrong in numerous instances. Specifically, his predictions on energy prices and oil production have proved to be consistently wrong and his analysis of oil and fossil fuels have omitted or distorted key facts, particularly in regards to peak oil. [2] [3] [4]

This reads more like a personal vendetta and difference in opinion than a "Record of Inaccurate Statements." I would argue that it ought to be removed altogether, considering the unprecedented amount of space it takes up in a relatively small article. At very least it should be called what it is, perhaps "Peak Oil Controversy," and recognize that this is one opinion, but there are many who support Yergin in his theories. http://www.thenewamerican.com/economy/commentary-mainmenu-43/10809-rising-oil-production-in-alberta-more-evidence-disproving-hubberts-peak
The cited articles appear to be accurate in that they cite specific data from government sources and compare that data to Yergin's comments. I do not see evidence of a personal vendetta. That others like Yergin's views does not make them more or less accurate in terms of the raw data, so I am not clear on how that matters.
  • Yes, it probably does require a citation to avoid a misrepresentation. I understand the commenter's irksomeness (who did not sign by the way) because of Yergin's influence over this issue, but there should be some evidence of, as in this example, his mistaken predictions with the use of citations. His influence on these issues ought to be addressed also, since he has personally stymied and interfered with any progress over the course of a 30 year history at developing alternative energy systems...Stevenmitchell (talk) 00:06, 1 June 2013 (UTC)

Foreign Policy resource[edit]

http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2011/11/28/the_global_thinkers_20_most_recommended_books?page=0,9

10. The Quest: Energy, Security, and the Remaking of the Modern World (2011) by Daniel Yergin Recommended by Gary Lash and Bjorn Lomborg

99.19.42.30 (talk) 07:43, 4 December 2011 (UTC)

Excerpt ...

In a long-awaited follow-up to his 1992 Pulitzer Prize winner, The Prize, Daniel Yergin delivers a sweeping account of the past and future of energy geopolitics. (Tip: Keep an eye out for the story of Global Thinker No. 36 George P. Mitchell.) "If this is to be an era of energy transition, then the $6 trillion global energy market is 'contestable.' That is, it is up for grabs among the incumbents -- the oil, gas, and coal companies that supply the bulk of today's energy -- and the new entrants -- such as wind, solar, and biofuels -- that want to capture a growing share of those dollars. A transition on this scale, if it does happen, has great significance for emissions, for the wider economy, for geopolitics, and for the position of nations."

99.181.131.59 (talk) 06:06, 5 December 2011 (UTC)
Absolutely no possible relevance to this article. — Arthur Rubin (talk) 07:38, 5 December 2011 (UTC)

book review resource[edit]

The Quest: Energy, Security, and the Remaking of the Modern World by Daniel Yergin, Reviewed by Richard N. Cooper January/February 2012 Foreign Affairs 99.19.44.155 (talk) 17:30, 8 January 2012 (UTC)

Add review[edit]

108.195.138.75 (talk) 05:28, 16 July 2012 (UTC)

Why add non-notable review? — Arthur Rubin (talk) 06:07, 16 July 2012 (UTC)