Talk:Dartmouth Time Sharing System

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Untitled[edit]

I think DTSS is actually fairly important in the bigger scheme of things as it was also used at the U.S. Naval Academy, where both DTSS and applications created for it were in use from the early 70's through the mid-90's. Most of the current senior officers (Admirals & Captains) in the U.S. Navy who are academy graduates learned computing using DTSS on big teletype machines. I registered for classes online in 1974--yes, USNA has had online registration since the 70's--and one of my classmates even hacked the system and registered early. The online registration program was still in use when I did a Web assist visit to the Academy in 1994. I will try to come up with some documentable source material as I know that personal experience is falling into disrepute here at Wikipedia--even though it is certainly original source material. Maybe I should just write a paper on it and then quote myself. Ray Trygstad (talk) 17:44, 28 January 2008 (UTC)

I agree, DTSS was very important. It was the template for many commercial time sharing systems, including Control Data's KRONOS and NOS systems, HP's timesharing systems, and UNIVAX's RTB (real time basic) system. Probably others as well. The history of operating systems often appears MIT-centric, but I think that is partly a matter of bias. Contemporary work simply has not gotten the same attention. DonPMitchell (talk) 19:33, 13 February 2009 (UTC)

Not just East Coast[edit]

In 1972, the five high schools of the Lakeshore School Board in West Island Montreal (later swallowed by the Lester B. Pearson School Board) were connected up to DTSS via local number with a fancy connection, using ASR-33s. Apparently the connection charges were more than they expected(!), and the next year they switched to the Protestant School Board of Greater Montreal's (ditto) overworked HP2000. It's a pity that there is so much "dark history" of non-MIT/non-ARPANET computing subjects. Ah well, the victors write the history FAQ. AndroidCat (talk) 04:54, 3 July 2009 (UTC)

I believe there were hundreds of school with teletypes connected to Dartmouth. The article mentions Goddard and the Merchant Marine Academy, but I accessed the system from Phillips Exeter and Bennington College, saw it used at UMASS, and would leave messages for my girlfriend at Abbot Academy, circa 1969-1971. Thomas144 (talk) 10:34, 10 February 2010 (UTC)

I would like to add that the system was active and installed at Concord (New Hampshire) High School in 1968-69 and perhaps as early as 1967. Several other high schools in NH were also connected and eventually we had a primitive form of email allowing limited communication with other schools. As I remember,we were allowed programs up to 8K and worked primarily in BASIC with FORTRAN later available, but rarely used. We had a Teletype Model ASR-33 with paper tape reader. Limited on line storage of programs was provided —Preceding unsigned comment added by 75.68.195.209 (talk) 15:54, 2 November 2010 (UTC)

Integrated design environment?[edit]

"Design" or "development?" I don't want to just change this as maybe it's "design" on purpose.