Talk:Dashi

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Japan / Food and drink (Rated Stub-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of the WikiProject Japan, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Japan-related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the project and see a list of open tasks. Current time in Japan: 22:06, April 16, 2014 (JST, Heisei 26) (Refresh)
Stub-Class article Stub  This article has been rated as Stub-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This page is supported by the Food and drink task force.
 
WikiProject Food and drink (Rated Stub-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Food and drink, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of food and drink related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Stub-Class article Stub  This article has been rated as Stub-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
 

Soy sauce?[edit]

Is soy sauce (tamari or shoyu) ever traditionally used in making dashi? Badagnani 04:59, 15 March 2007 (UTC)

As far as I know, while it is added to soups made from dashi, it is not considered part of the soup stock. Erk|Talk -- I like traffic lights -- 11:21, 15 March 2007 (UTC)
Dashi is made from Kombu and bonito flakes. Soy sauce is a seasoning agent added to soups made with dashi, but it is not an ingredient in dashi broth.--Christopher Tanner, CCC 05:17, 23 May 2007 (UTC)

Salt[edit]

Is salt ever traditionally used in making dashi? Badagnani 05:14, 26 June 2007 (UTC)

It depends on what dashi uses for. If you directly use Dashi for making soup base of some noodles, you can put salt into it. However, if you use it for stewing something sweetly, for example Nikujaga, don't put salt into it before putting suger, because salt prevents giving taste of suger to foods.
In Japanese coocking, order of putting basic seasonings is fixed strictly. Japanese represend it as "Sa Shi Su Se So (さしすせそ)"."Sa (さ)" is "Sato (suger)". "Shi (し)" is "Shio (salt)". "Su (す) is "Su (vinegar)". "Se (せ)" is "Shoyu (soy sauce)": in old written language of Japan, sometimes "Shoyu" wrote "Seuyu (せうゆ)". "So (そ)" is "Miso".--220.49.95.78 01:33, 11 February 2008 (UTC)

Photo[edit]

Thanks for the photos. We could still use photos of the actual broth, as well as a photo of it being made with the traditional ingredients. Badagnani 00:06, 15 July 2007 (UTC)

But the broth doesn't look like anything special. If you're going to bother with a picture of the broth, why not just use a picture of miso soup or something? I wish I could help with the traditional ingredient photo. That would be nice to have. Franzeska 03:21, 15 July 2007 (UTC)

A photo of the actual broth would be great. It doesn't matter if it doesn't look like anything special. If it wasn't a special thing, we wouldn't have a WP article called "Dashi." Badagnani (talk) 20:27, 9 March 2008 (UTC)

User: eshebang How about a picture of the actual bonito flakes, instead of a picture of the granulated mix packages? If anyone has one from the katsuoboshi merchants in Tsukiji fish market in Tokyo to show the various grades of the flakes, that would be great. Thanks to all for this great page and especially to the person who posted Sa Shi Su Se So, the order to mix in the ingredients, that's a fantastic piece of knowledge/culture. Let it be known to non-japanese speakers that the vowel order of that line follows the way hiragana alphabet is learnt.˜˜˜˜˜ —Preceding unsigned comment added by Eshebang (talkcontribs) 22:32, 29 March 2009 (UTC)


Fresh Dashi[edit]

About the line: "Fresh dashi, made from dried kelp and katsuobushi, is rare today, even in Japan." Is this actually the case? Dashi has been one of those up and coming foods (or dish ingredients) you hear a lot of these days (in the US), be it in fine dining or on TV with some of the cooking shows (and on quite a few blogs dabbling in world cuisine), and I cannot fathom a professional chef using granulated dashi when the real thing is so simple to create. I would imagine the only reason for it would be if you couldn't source the kombu or bonito flakes, and my assumption is that professional chefs and most people in medium to large (American) metro areas would not have an issue (nor would anyone with access to a host of internet suppliers). I have no direct knowledge that this line is incorrect, and perhaps it actually is 100% correct, but even so it might be a bit misleading to someone just getting familiar with dashi as an ingredient and lead one to not even bother trying to create their own dashi. This might be completely beside the point. Any thoughts? Laxpanther (talk) 02:27, 7 March 2012 (UTC)