Talk:Datura inoxia

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innoxia vs. inoxia[edit]

I changed all the relevant instances of "innoxia" to "inoxia". I left the "nn" spelling in the file names of pictures, and in the sentence that says it "is often cited as Datura innoxia". That sentence really didn't make any sentence when the "nn" spelling was already being used throughout the article (although not in the title). The "nn" spelling is certainly worth mentioning; there are more Google hits for this spelling than for "inoxia". However, every authoritative online reference I've checked (TROPICOS, IPNI, USDA PLANTS, ARS-GRIN) uses the single "n" spelling. Unless somebody can come up with a nomenclaturally authoritative reference for "innoxia", "inoxia" should be the spelling used in the article. 192.104.39.2 (talk) 17:15, 30 October 2008 (UTC)

Misleading name? Ornamental varieties?[edit]

From what I've read of this wildflower, it's not exactly 'inoffensive'. Swallowing or inhaling this is about as dumb as sucking on a Euphorbia cactus, sap-laced thorns and all. You know, the ones they use to kill fish. Some people are thick as bricks, I guess.  :/ A good question to answer for the article is how often this is grown for ornamental purposes.

"It has also been planted throughout the world as an ornamental plant for its attractive large leaves, large white flowers, and distinctive thorny fruit. However, the plant is now considered an invasive species in several locations. For example, because of the similarity of its life cycle to that of cotton, it is a pest in cotton fields. It is also a potential seed contaminant." This really needs expansion.

2601:1:9280:155:9A9:9FCA:C8D7:C2FA (talk) 00:59, 9 March 2014 (UTC)