Talk:David Jenkins (bishop)

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Conjuring trick[edit]

OK, I'm confused: why would there be such a strong objection to him saying that the Resurrection was 'not a conjuring trick'? If you mean that he was misquoted as saying that it was a conjuring trick, when he'd actually said the opposite, and the fuss was over the misquoted version, then you should say that. If you're saying that mainstream Anglicans felt that the Resurrection really was a conjuring trick, and were upset at a theologian telling them it was genuine (which seems fairly unlikely... but this is what the article at present seems to imply), then say that. If you're saying something else, then the article should make it clearer what the complaint was about. Anaxial (talk) 15:57, 7 February 2008 (UTC)

I think his point was something along the lines of that many people have reduced the significance of the resurrection by portraying it as if it were a mere conjuring trick. Thus he was making a fairly orthodox point but possibly portraying mainstream opinion in somewhat offensive language. However, he was widely misquoted as having said the precise opposite of what he did say. Also, it must be put in the context of his belief that the risen Jesus may not have had a physical body and that he wouldn't be coming back, both of which are quite unorthodox views (even if admirable).--Oxonian2006 (talk) 01:01, 8 March 2008 (UTC)

According to his autobiography "The Calling Of A Cuckoo" the "conjuring trick with bones" quote was taken from a much broader argument concerning the place of divine intervention in modern times: "I am not clear God manoeuvres physical things. I am clear that he works miracles through personal responses and faith...You cannot have a religious view about reality and another view about life....I am quite clear that God has not abandoned reality after the first century or even after the fourth century, and therefore to insist that to be a Christian you have to think in the way the New Testament thought (still less that you have to think in the way that fourth-century people thought) is simply a lack of faith in God. It is to deny God in history and to fail in our mission." (Calling Of A Cuckoo. Continuum Press pges 134-5.)

Military Service[edit]

I have input details of his military service from 1943 to 1947 from mentions "The Calling of a Cuckoo" (which I am currently reading), which contains his Commission Day photo from 1945. As the book did not purport to be a conventional life story, I am aware the details may not be complete enough so sourced additions or amendments are welcomed. Questions begged are: Had he served in another branch of the army before commissioning in the RA? Did he see service outside England before his commissioning? When did he go abroad after commissioning? Did he see duty in another country before arrival in India? Did he rise in the ranks before he took his officer training (likely)? "Who's Who" (2012) only mentions "EC [Emergency Commission]RA 1945-47 (Captain)" about his service.Cloptonson (talk) 08:47, 7 April 2013 (UTC)