Talk:Dawn chorus (electromagnetic)

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can these dawn choruses actually be heard (i.e. it's sound). or is it just a transformation from EM fields to acoustics? --Abdull 21:05, 4 Apr 2005 (UTC)

No. It is EM waves, but they are at audio frequencies (instead of the 100s of kilohertz or megahertz of "normal radio" signals). So you need to build an amplifier to convert them into sound. — Omegatron 18:43, 24 September 2005 (UTC)

"It is thought to be caused by high-energy electrons that get caught in the Van Allen radiation belts of the Earth's magnetosphere and fall to the Earth's surface in the form of audible radio waves."

That is incorrect and vague on multiple counts. Radio waves are not audible, and electrons cannot be converted into radio waves; I believe what is referred to is the generation of radio waves (perhaps as synchrotron radiation) by electrons captured in the Van Allen belts, but the statement's vagueness makes it hard to be sure. -Anonymous, 26 April 2006
It's only my estimate, but I think this phenomenon is a mixture of bremsstrahlung and synchrotron radiation.
Possibly a better way of putting this phrase would be:
"It is thought to be caused by high-energy electrons interacting with the Van Allen radiation belts, producing audio-frequency radio waves by either Synchrotron radiation or Bremsstrahlung."
DragonElf66 (talk) 12:27, 11 November 2011 (UTC)
I fixed it, with references Drdan14 (talk) 20:42, 11 November 2011 (UTC)

The Equations[edit]

Check the equations of James Clerk Maxwell to find the answer for yourself. 199.64.0.252 19:57, 16 July 2007 (UTC)