Talk:Debt levels and flows

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Comments[edit]

It'd be useful if there were graphs (or even tables) of those numbers. It's hard to read all that data in the current format.

Hi, I think you have collected a lot of great information. Can I suggest that you start your work by explaining why countries issue debt, how they do it and in which format. I would then move on to explaining why companies, financial institutions, agencies, etc issue and in which formats. links to bond debt, structured notes, etc would then be very useful. --Myrtlemh (talk) 21:16, 17 November 2009 (UTC)

Mortgages[edit]

Do I get that right, that the numbers doesn't include "mortgage originators" loan production? The Countrywide 2003 annual report ([1]) said on page 18 "in 2003, total U.S. residential mortgage production reached a record level of $3.8 trillion". But $900 billion of that was re-issued through MBSs, and the $545.5 billion of FHLB borrowing is also going to buy houses I suppose?--Jerryseinfeld 22:52, 4 Jan 2005 (UTC)

Or is it simply so that this tracks all corporate debt issance, and not personal debt issuance?--Jerryseinfeld 05:35, 9 Jan 2005 (UTC)

Discussion on references[edit]

This article lacks sources in a major way and has been appropriately tagged. I'll try to do something about it, hopefully others will also participate. To illustrate, US Household debt was previously listed as

  • 2003: $9.2 trillion (90% of GDP) (67.5% of "households’ gross disposable income")

while in reality, it is

  • 2005: $11.8 trillion (95% of GDP) (130% of "households’ gross disposable income")

Note the difference of two years, but still, the original information was grossly misleading regarding the debt/income ratio (or I messed up with the calculations, but you can verify that below).

To help with checking the accuracy of figures quoted, I added a "References explained" section to this talk page. Because the references can be links to multi-page documents (such as the Flow of Funds Accounts of the US), this section could be used to explain how exactly the numbers have been calculated. This would make it easier to check the references for errors. Perhaps the section could eventually become a footnote in the article, but I'll start it here... Tritec 10:30, 5 February 2007 (UTC)

Updated the US Household debt to 2006/Q2, so the above example just became outdated - but the point made using it is still valid. Tritec 20:26, 5 February 2007 (UTC)

References explained[edit]

  • US Credit market debt:
To get the total amount of debt: See L.1.1, Total credit market debt owed by: [2]
To get total credit market debt as a percentage of GDP, divide L.1.1, Total credit market debt owed by:, with F.6.1, Gross Domestic Product (GDP) [3] Tritec 20:32, 5 February 2007 (UTC)
  • US Household sector:
To get the total amount of debt: See D.3, Total Household Debt [4]
To get household debt as a percentage of GDP, divide D.3, Total Household Debt, with F.6.1, Gross Domestic Product (GDP) [5]
To get household debt as a percentage of household disposable income, divide D.3, Total Household Debt, with F.100.3, Disposable Personal Income [6] Tritec 10:30, 5 February 2007 (UTC)