Talk:Democratic Republic of Georgia

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Czech Republic?[edit]

do you mean Czechoslovakia? Czech Republic came into existence only in 1993. rado 09:23, 27 Jan 2005 (UTC)

Hmmm.... I'll change it to First Republic of Czechoslovakia, which might have been unofficially (and wrongly) referred to as 'Czech Republic' at the time. -- PFHLai 02:56, 2005 Feb 24 (UTC)

changes[edit]

Some of the changes I've been reverting of yours explained: linking the Mountainous Republic to Northern Caucausus: this is a poor example of piping, as the Northern Caucausus article only talks about the region, not the short-lived autonomous region. Furthermore, the land comparison should remain, to explain the difference in area between the two incarnations of the republic of Georgia. Feel free to respond. Tim Rhymeless (Er...let's shimmy) 04:29, 17 August 2005 (UTC)

It is wrong[edit]

Georgia had never owned the cities such as Artvin, Ardahan and also the regions around these cities. The map claims that till 1921, these lands were belong to Georgia but actually these cities were invaded by the Russian Empire during World War One(when there wasn't a country named Georgia).After the Soviet Revolution, Russians retreated from the parts that they occupied during the war.Then during the Turkish War of Indipendence, General Kazım Karabekir kept these lands in safety.Deliogul 09:45, 26 May 2006 (UTC)

Karabekir retook these areas only in 1921, when the Georgians evacuated them amid the Soviet invasion. Kober 11:17, 26 May 2006 (UTC)

Formatting[edit]

The side info boxes spill down past the end of the main section, and push the text for the History section significantly below the header. Can someone with more wikiformatting knowledge please fix this?

Map dispute[edit]

The map of the Azerbaijan Democratic Republic shows the territory of Zaqatala (now the rayons of Balakan, Zaqatala, and Qakh) as fully part of Azerbaijan, while here it is shown as parts of the DRG and on the DRA (Democratic Republic of Armenia) page the territory is shown as disputed between Azerbaijan and Georgia. Also Lori, a territory that was usually considered to be disputed between Armenia and Georgia is shown as a disputed territory between Georgia and Azerbaijan. Also, the historic city of Rustavi (shown as Shulaveri) is also shown as being contested with Azerbaijan. Both maps of Armenia and Georgia from this period convey a completely different story to the reader, in comparison to that of Azerbaijan. Something's not right. -- Clevelander 22:08, 22 June 2006 (UTC)

I've uploaded more authoritative maps from Atlas of Conflicts webiste to the DRG article. They are fairly accurate. The reason why these maps show the disputed Lorri and Zaqatala regions parts of Georgia is that the DRG was the only Transcaucasian republic de jure recognized by Moscow and the Allies in her early 1921 borders while ADR and DRA fell to the Soviets before they could gain de jure status.--Kober 04:59, 23 June 2006 (UTC)
This is true. Andersen’s maps are more accurate. Kober why the photo of Zordania just mentions him being a Menshevik leader and not President of DRG? Ldingley 21:26, 5 July 2006 (UTC)
You're correct, Luis. Thanks.--Kober 05:48, 6 July 2006 (UTC)

1920 events[edit]

The number of Georgian refugees from Abkhazia is mentioned in the articles about Georgia, History of Georgia, Politics of Georgia and probably in several others. I think the same approach should be applied here. Alaexis 05:56, 20 April 2007 (UTC)

The problem of Georgian IDPs dominates many aspects of Georgia's politics and the 1920 events can hardly be compared to the ethnic cleansing of Georgians in its scale. The population transfer and forced displacement in the post-revolutionary chaos affected not only Ossetians, but also Georgians (notably, Muslims), Armenians, Azeris, Russians, etc. An example is the expulsion of Georgians by Denikin's army from Sochi District. There is no need to go into extensive details in this article. They are discussed in more specific topics.--KoberTalk 08:18, 20 April 2007 (UTC)

Maps[edit]

Carte de la Georgie, 1920.jpg
Territorial losses of Georgia after the Russian red army occupation in 1921.jpg

I think that the 2 maps to the right should not be used at all in this article or anywhere else in the en:WP. Here are the issues with them:

1. There are factual errors in them, along with territories actually controlled by Georgians it shows as Georgian territories that were assigned to Georgia according to the Treaty of Sevres, but were never controlled by DRG, such as modern Turkey's Black Sea coast with towns of Rize and Hopa. This very article says:

2. Both are not in English (1st - French, 2nd - Georgian), and would be thus hard to understand for an English-speaking reader

3. The quality of both is below satisfactory, in case of the upper map no captions can be discerned.

4. The name of the lower map (Territorial losses of Georgia after the Russian red army occupation in 1921) fails NPOV, as not all these losses happened "after" or were caused by Soviet occupation, i. e. Sochi region.

Also, the territories DRG actually controlled were not controlled simultaneously: for example Sochi region was lost by Georgia in May 1919, while Batumi and Lori region were only incorporated in 1920. Both maps fail to clarify this to the reader.

We can discuss the pros and cons of the old map here, but if it comes from Robert H. Hewsen's "Armenia: A Historical Atlas" (2001), page 236, as claimed here, then I don't see any NPOV or RS problems with it, and in terms of readablity and clarity it's clearly superior to the maps to the right. Alæxis¿question? 09:47, 28 June 2011 (UTC)

Alaexis, Could you please provide the source for this:

Thanks in advance, Abkhazian1 (talk) 09:53, 3 November 2014 (UTC)

I don't have sources confirming this, I merely noted the contradiction between what had already been written in the article and the map. But that's a good question, as the Treaty of Sèvres article says nothing about Georgia and some of the maps in it contradict this claim. I'll put a fact tag after the sentence. Alæxis¿question? 23:57, 3 November 2014 (UTC)

File:The First Armenian Republic 1918-1920.gif Nominated for speedy Deletion[edit]

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