Talk:Dewi Shri

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Dewi or Devi[edit]

I think it should be "Devi" instead of "Dewi". Nein 17:51, 3 November 2006 (UTC)

It's Indonesian spelling. She is an Indonesian goddess revered by Balinese, Javanese and Sundanese, so Indonesia spelling is more appropriate. Matahari Pagi 09:19, 24 September 2007 (UTC)

Hindu Goddesses[edit]

The concept of Rice Goddess is more of a native Austronesian concept. Dewi Sri herself has various alternative native names. After the people in Nusantara adopt Hinduism, they kept their goddess but with a new name to please Hinduism. So, aside from the nam, I can't see her connection to Devi and Shri. Do Indians even have any goddess of rice? Matahari Pagi 09:26, 24 September 2007 (UTC)

Dewi Sri NOT Devi Shri norShri[edit]

Indonesian, especially Javanese (actually wong Jawa) do not have the sound "v" in their alphabet. Devi Shri is totally unknown if not unpronounceable to 95%+ of all Indonesians:
The Dentawiyanjana (aka Aksara Jawa) (from the Hindu Brahman Dewanegari) ha-na-ca-ra-ka, da-ta-sa-wa-la, pa-dha-ja-ya-nya, ma-ga-ba-ta-nga
No "v" nor "sh".
All Indian Sanskrita became Javanised: "v" became "w", na became "nga", etc 'Sh' in Indonesian is also an Islamic-Persian loan-sound: masyarakat, musyolah, syariah, etc as is the sound "z": zaman, zafir etc. Although Hindu's from India greatly shaped Javanese and Indonesian society and culture- they are not solely responsible for it, and Islam had a longer presence a far greater socio-poltical and educational effect. To believe Hinduism more important than it truly was is blatant neo-Hindu cultural aggrandisation and bigotted chauvinism, and most unbecoming. Thank-you.Starstylers (talk) 15:09, 24 July 2009 (UTC)

References[edit]

I will include references shortly.Starstylers (talk) 15:14, 24 July 2009 (UTC) [[1]] [[2]] [[3]]