Talk:Dietary Reference Intake

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RDA is ambiguous[edit]

In the article for Reference Daily Intake it is stated that "The RDI is based on the older Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) from 1968." The RDI established the RDV, which is printed on nutrition labels. In this article it is stated that "The RDA is used to determine the Recommended Daily Value (RDV) which is printed on food labels in the U.S. and Canada" immediately after the description of DRI. This is misleading since the RDA from the DRI is not the one used on food labels. I recommend this sentence be moved/removed. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.22.94.226 (talk) 03:34, 2 June 2013 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done I think has been fixed for a while now. TuxLibNit (talk) 22:53, 17 September 2014 (UTC)

Peaches LOW in Vitamin C.[edit]

Peaches only contain 6.6 mg (8% Dietary Reference Intake) of Vitamin C per 100 grams. (SEE THE TABLE IN: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peach#Nutrition_and_research) This means you will need to eat over 1.2 KG of peaches to get 100% of the DRI of Vitamin C.

Therefore this article is wrong in stating that peaches are a "top source" of Vitamin C. Please remove 'peaches' from the table in the article.--197.79.0.5 (talk) 20:10, 26 May 2013 (UTC)

The article has been (more or less) correctly reflecting what the (old) USDA database says but there is an anomaly in the database. It lists "Peaches, frozen, sliced, sweetened" as 94 mg/100g but the next-highest peach item to be listed is "Peaches, raw" at 6.6 mg/100g (with variations on "canned with syrup" lower still). I suspect the high listing in the database is either for a specific fortified product or is simply an error. I've taken peaches out of the list in the article for now.TuxLibNit (talk) 23:13, 17 September 2014 (UTC)
Oops. Ascorbic acid/Vitamin C is routinely added when freezing peaches to prevent browning. So it is effectively fortification but generic to frozen peaches, not specific to a single product. I've reinstated as frozen peaches with a note to clarify.TuxLibNit (talk) 23:32, 1 October 2014 (UTC)

Omega-6 to Omega-3 ratio[edit]

Hasn't it already been determined that the 17:1 ratio typical to the American diet is unhealthy and that the >4:1 ratio is preferable?

Top Sources in Common Measures[edit]

I've recently updated the Vitamin A and C lists to better reflect the given source. I suspect that most of the other entries are also inconsistant with that source due to unsourced incremental changes going unchallenged. The version of the source used (release 23) is outdated — release 27 is here. Before I consider making a pass through the list to update it, can anyone suggest a better source for similar information? One that doesn't involve quite so much WP:OR to distil a sensible list of food types from the exhaustive list of specific products with different preservation and cooking methods. One that doesn't implicitly describe liver as a "top source" for Vitamin A when according to a UK NHS website, liver consumption should be limited. Or perhaps it would be better to delete this "Dietary Sources" column altogether?TuxLibNit (talk) 22:47, 17 September 2014 (UTC)