Talk:Disbarment

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Clinton "disbarment"[edit]

Bill Clinton wasn't disbarred - his law license was suspended for five years. There's a real difference between the two - one permanently prohibits him from the practice of law in Arkansas again, and the other explicitly prohibits such for a limited period. To call it disbarment is political and POV. JavaGuy 17:20, 19 June 2007 (UTC)

I deleted the section. It was a lie designed to mislead readers. Dishonest entries should not be allowed in Wikipedia.--14 June 2009 —Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.56.29.41 (talk) 17:12, 14 June 2009 (UTC)

Even if he didn't actually get disbarred from the Supreme Court because he resigned, it's worth mentioning him (just as pages on impeachment mentions Nixon). I added text to this effect, and noted that he was not actually disbarred. --Deusnoctum 10:17, 8 October 2007 (UTC)

NPOV[edit]

"For most lawyers, this can essentially mean no longer having a livelihood."

Seems like this is an blatant opinion. What say the rest of you? Hachiko 21:02, 6 October 2007 (UTC)

  • I'm inclined to disagree. If you spent dozens or hundreds of thousands of dollars and several years training for a profession, practice it for several years, and are then banned from it, I'd certainly consider that a loss of livelihood. However, the wording is somewhat awkward and could use changing. --Deusnoctum 10:17, 8 October 2007 (UTC)

Additionally, this does not seem to reflect a worldwide view of the subject. Perhaps a the style of "In the United States of America..." — Preceding unsigned comment added by 62.44.135.49 (talk) 15:39, 20 January 2014 (UTC)