Talk:Distillation

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legality of distillation[edit]

According to homedistiller.org (unlicensed) distillation is an illegal process in most if not all nations, except New Zealand. I doubt this, but was wondering if there is any detail on the legality of distillation per country. --— robbie page talk 16:17, 3 July 2011 (UTC)

The New Zealand situation is restricted to small stills and for personal use. It's in their Criminal Code. In Australia, it's illegal to own a still of less than 5 litres capacity but illegal to use such a still for distillation of alcohol.

In some parts of Europe, artisanal amateur distilling is tolerated for personal use (if not entirely legal). In the UK and Ireland, it's entirely illegal and not tolerated without a licence. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 130.116.161.48 (talk) 09:15, 27 October 2011 (UTC)

Minimum difference in boiling point temperatures for simple distillation to be useful?[edit]

This page says the minimum difference in boiling point temperatures of compounds in a mixture in order for simple distillation to be useful is 25°C. My textbook (Gilbert and Martin, Experimental Organic Chemistry 4th edition) says the minimum temperature difference is 40-50°C, which is a huge difference. The textbook says that 20-30°C is the minimum for fractional distillation. I tend to agree with my textbook as we just did simple distillation of Ethyl Acetate and Butyl Acetate (difference in b.p. 49°C) in my Orgo lab and the results were less than great. But that's original research so I was wondering if anyone else had an opinion or a better source.

Not sure how to answer clearly, but here goes... The concept of there being a need for a minimum difference in boiling points is erroneous and probably comes from rules of thumb for separating two pure phases in a single distillation using a simple apparatus. That is, if you can boil off 100% of phase A without boiling off/condensing phase B. Think back to WWII in Norway, when heavy water was separated from "normal" water by multiple distillation. The boiling point difference is only 1.4 degrees, yet heavy water was successfully produced. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 130.116.161.48 (talk) 09:11, 27 October 2011 (UTC)

distilation of ethyle acetate and isopropyl ether[edit]

i want to know how can we seperate ea and ipe having composition 10% and 90% respectively. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 59.98.39.80 (talk) 10:38, 14 February 2012 (UTC)

"A still is the apparatus used for distillation"[edit]

Isn't the word still primarily used only for primitive traditional devices and for devices used in the destillation of alcohol(ic beverages) and perfume etc? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 150.227.15.253 (talk) 10:08, 30 December 2013 (UTC)

Question about a redirect[edit]

Currently, Distilled alcohol redirects here. Wouldn't it make at least equal sense to point to Distilled beverage instead? --Florian Blaschke (talk) 22:43, 29 July 2014 (UTC)